National Geographic Traveller Food

National Geographic Traveller Food Winter 2020

National Geographic Traveller Food focuses on where to go, what to see and how to explore the world via unique culinary experiences. Its writers talk to producers, suppliers, farmers, chefs and restaurateurs, and this authentic storytelling is accompanied by so-good-you-can-almost-taste-it photography. Whether it’s uncovering the truth behind a gourmet trend, sharing delicious recipes or taking readers on the bumpy journey from farm to fork, the magazine champions sustainability and celebrates local cultures. Across its pages, National Geographic Traveller Food serves up the latest culinary experiences, shares insight on cultural contexts and offers practical advice, from deconstructing classic dishes and ‘breaking bread’ with families across the globe to meeting the food world’s new pioneers.

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Страна:
United Kingdom
Язык:
English
Издатель:
National Geographic Traveller (UK)
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2 мин.
five ways with kohlrabi

I first ‘discovered’ kohlrabi in southern Sweden while I was running my first restaurant, in the coastal town of Helsingborg. The area is where much of Sweden’s root vegetable, cabbage and kohlrabi crop is cultivated. Part of the same family of brassicas as broccoli, cauliflower, kale and brussels sprouts, kohlrabi is a fantastic vegetable that’s popular in Germany and Central Europe. It grows above ground, but bears some resemblance to a turnip, with a bulbous green or purple stem and crunchy, white flesh that can be eaten raw or cooked. I prefer to keep it simple, letting the natural sweetness and crisp texture speak for itself. Flavour-wise, when raw, kohlrabi could be compared to celery or radish, and when cooked it’s milder and sweeter. The British kohlrabi season runs from July…

6 мин.
the pioneer

“Have I helped to change people’s understanding of Russian flavours? Yeah, I think so,” says Evgeny Vikentev. “I’ve had a lot of people come up to me after dinner and tell me, ‘Evgeny, that was super-interesting. We thought Russian cuisine was just pelmeni [dumplings].’” The chef set up his St Petersburg restaurant, Hamlet + Jacks, in 2015, with friends Evgeniy Litvyak, Evgeniy Khitkov, Evgeniy Tonkov and Hamlet Movsisya. He’s part of a new generation of chefs spearheading a movement in Russian gastronomy, using local ingredients and modern techniques to push boundaries and change perceptions of the country’s cuisine. Located a short walk from Nevsky Prospect, St Petersburg’s main shopping street, Hamlet + Jacks is a slick, industrial-style restaurant. You won’t spot pelmeni or borscht on the menu here — instead, you’ll find…

3 мин.
my life in food romesh ranganathan

My mum’s a great cook. I grew up eating bucketloads of South Indian and Sri Lankan food. My main memory is mutton curry with white rice, dhal and maybe some cabbage or spinach. I’m vegan now, but back then I ate a lot of meat and that dish was the thing we’d always get excited about. In Sri Lankan food, you also have ‘short eats’ (small snacks) — vade and stufflike that. Dosa, too. She used to make all that. I recently learnt to cook Sri Lankan food. My mum gave me — for the first time ever — the full recipe for her vegetable curry. We went over for lunch and my mum and I made all the Sri Lankan stuffourselves. She was over the moon. She’d been waiting years…

3 мин.
ludlow

In the English-Welsh borderlands, the ruins of Ludlow’s medieval castle are a clue that this pretty market town was once a political powerhouse: the administrative capital of Wales. It’s now part of south Shropshire, over on the English side, and has become as well-known for its gastronomy as its history and good looks. A rural setting close to bountiful Herefordshire, Worcestershire and the Welsh Marches ensures a year-round supply of quality produce, and as a result, many Ludlovians are passionate about championing ‘real’ food and independent businesses. Ludlow Food Festival was arguably the first of its kind in the country, established 25 years ago as a riposte to a proposed supermarket development nearby. The festival was put on hold for 2020, but for an outdoor foodie fix, try the Ludlow Local…

1 мин.
ethically sourced, organic dinners, three nights a week

My story starts with wind and fire; born in Baku, Azerbaijan, a country of precious traditions and a magnificent passion for food. The first memory that comes to mind when I think about the start of my journey is my grandma in the kitchen, experimenting with recipes using the best hand-picked ingredients from the land. It is easy for me to see that my passion was born here – by connecting with authentic flavours from my childhood and learning about the land, I am able to serve a new type of love - the love for our planet @foodbydana_uk www.foodbydana.com…

2 мин.
try it now veggie christmas

Christmas is likely to be very different this year, with the ‘rule of six’ meaning fewer people around the table. Many home cooks are turning away from turkey for fear of waste or endless leftovers. Some turkey farmers have seen a drop in orders for large birds, and while chicken or goose are obvious substitutes, why not experiment this year with a meat-free main? From plant-based steaks to savoury bakes, vegetarian dishes can be scaled up or down, and often come with all the usual Christmas trimmings. We asked chefs for their favourite veggie centrepieces. Seitan steaks and maple-roasted roots “A traditional roast dinner is one of our favourite meals — we just have ours without the meat,” say Henry Firth and Ian Theasby. Their latest vegan cookbook, Speedy Bosh! (£22, HarperCollins),…