СТАТЬИБИБЛИОТЕКА
Бизнес и финансы
The Economist Continental Europe Edition

The Economist Continental Europe Edition 03/25/2017

The Economist is the premier source for the analysis of world business and current affairs, providing authoritative insight and opinion on international news, world politics, business, finance, science and technology, as well as overviews of cultural trends and regular Special reports on industries and countries.

Страна:
United Kingdom
Язык:
English
Издатель:
The Economist Newspaper Limited - Europe
Периодичность:
Weekly
Читать больше
ПОДПИСАТЬСЯ
22 990 ₽
51 Выпуск(ов)

в этом номере

8 мин.
the world this week

Politics A terrorist attacked central London. The British-born man drove a car along the pavement across Westminster Bridge, killing at least two people and leaving around 40 injured. He then entered the grounds of Parliament, the heart of Britain’s democracy, and fatally stabbed an unarmed policeman before being shot dead. This “marauding” method of terror attack—using a vehicle to mow people down in a crowded area—was similar to atrocities carried out by Islamists last year in France and Germany. The British government announced that it had informed the European Council of its intention to invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon treaty on March 29th, triggering the legal request to leave the EU. There is still little clarity from the government about its intentions, and voters appear to be confused, too. A survey…

5 мин.
how to save europe

ON MARCH 25th 1957, with the shadow of the second world war still hanging over them, six European countries signed the founding treaty of a new sort of international club. The European Union, as the club came to be called, achieved success on a scale its founders could barely have imagined, not only underpinning peace on the continent but creating a single market as well as a single currency, and bringing into its fold ex-dictatorships to the south and ex-communist countries to the east, as it expanded from six members to 28. Yet even as today’s European leaders gather in Rome this weekend to celebrate the 60th anniversary, they know their project is in big trouble. The threats are both external and internal. Internally, the flaws that became glaringly evident in…

5 мин.
amazon’s empire

AMAZON is an extraordinary company. The former bookseller accounts for more than half of every new dollar spent online in America. It is the world’s leading provider of cloud computing. This year Amazon will probably spend twice as much on television as HBO, a cable channel. Its own-brand physical products include batteries, almonds, suits and speakers linked to a virtual voice-activated assistant that can control, among other things, your lamps and sprinkler. Yet Amazon’s shareholders are working on the premise that it is just getting started. Since the beginning of 2015 its share price has jumped by 173%, seven times quicker than in the two previous years (and 12 times faster than the S&P 500 index). With a market capitalisation of some $400bn, it is the fifth-most-valuable firm in the world.…

3 мин.
china first

ALMOST exactly a hundred years ago, America was poised to send troops to Europe to fight in a war which was not in the country’s narrow, short-term self-interest. Fifty thousand of them would die, more than fell in either Vietnam or Korea. That carnage started an argument that has not let up since: does America have a broad interest in maintaining global stability and prosperity? Or should it conserve its blood and treasure and let the rest of the world go to hell? A couple of months into his presidency it is clear that Donald Trump’s campaign slogan, “America First”, means something like the latter. He wants a more powerful army, but can treat allies with contempt and thinks aid and diplomacy are a waste of time. He believes that…

2 мин.
breaking free

SCIENCE advances fastest when data and conclusions are shared as quickly as possible. Yet it is common practice for medical researchers to hoard results for months or years until research is published in an academic journal. Even then, the data underpinning a study are often not made public. The incentive to withhold findings is powerful. Journal papers are the de facto measure of a scientist’s productivity. To win research money and get promoted, scientists need to accrue an impressive list of publications. Yet the delays in disseminating knowledge have the capacity to do real harm: during the Zika crisis, sponsors of research had to persuade publishers to declare that scientists would not be penalised for releasing their findings early. Nor are elite journals the guardians of quality that they often claim…

3 мин.
vaulting ambition

MORE treasured than the bullion in its vaults are the data a bank has stored on its servers. Bankers know what their customers eat, where they shop and, increasingly, what they get up to online. It is possible for customers to share these data with others, but the process is cumbersome. In effect, banks enjoy a monopoly over data that has helped them get away with lousy service and fend off newcomers with better ideas. In Europe, at least, that is all about to change. The source of this upheaval is a new set of regulations, snappily named the Second Payment Service Directive, or “PSD2” (see page 65). The rules, which are being finalised and will be in force from January next year, will compel banks to share data easily with…