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Новости и Политика
The Week

The Week V. 1251

The Week covers the Best of the British and Foreign Media. With its non partisan reporting, The Week gives the reader an insight into all the the news, people, arts, drama, property, books and how the international media has reported it. This concise guide allows the reader to be up to date and have a wealth of knowledge to allow them to discuss all these key topics with their friends and peers.

Страна:
United Kingdom
Язык:
English
Издатель:
Dennis Publishing UK
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9 мин.
the main stories… …and how they were covered

What happened A Christmas election Britain will head to the polls for its first December general election since 1923, after MPs this week voted to go to the country. Boris Johnson’s plan to hold Britain’s third election in four years was approved by 438 to 20 on Tuesday; the vote will be held on 12 December. Johnson had tried and failed three times to get Parliament’s backing for an early election: a two-thirds majority was needed under the Fixed-term Parliaments Act. But Labour leader Jeremy Corybn finally agreed to drop his opposition, after confirmation from Brussels of a Brexit extension until 31 January meant there was no longer any prospect of a no-deal exit. The Liberal Democrats and the SNP had already promised to give their support, arguing that an election was the…

1 мин.
the week

“Snowflake Oxford University students ban clapping and replace it with ‘jazz hands’ to stop ‘anxiety’.” Thus The Sun recorded the latest chapter in Britain’s culture wars. The truth was, of course, slightly different. No one banned anything: Oxford’s student union, like Manchester University’s before it, passed a motion encouraging the use of British Sign Language clapping – waving hands at shoulder height, also known as “silent jazz hands” – at council meetings, arguing that applause is an “access issue” for students who have “anxiety disorders, sensory sensitivity and... use hearing aids”. So it’s a small story but one that, to me, raises a lot of questions. How many people have ever been disturbed by clapping? If so, why are students so anxious? And aren’t there better ways of helping them cope?…

1 мин.
the week

Editor-in-chief: Caroline Law Editor: Theo Tait Deputy editor: Harry Nicolle Executive editor: Laurence Earle City editor: Jane Lewis Editorial assistant: Asya Likhtman Contributing editors: Daniel Cohen, Charity Crewe, Thomas Hodgkinson, Simon Wilson, Rob McLuhan, Anthony Gardner, William Underhill, Digby Warde-Aldam, Tom Yarwood, William Skidelsky Editorial staff: Anoushka Petit, Tigger Ridgwell, Sorcha Bradley, Aaron Drapkin Picture editor: Xandie Nutting Art director: Nathalie Fowler Sub-editor: Alasdair Morton Production editor: Alanna O’Connell Editorial chairman and co-founder: Jeremy O’Grady Production Manager: Maaya Mistry Production Executive: Sophie Griffin Newstrade Director: David Barker Direct Marketing Director: Abi Spooner Inserts: Jack Reader Classified: Henry Haselock, Rebecca Seetanah, Nicholas Fisher Account Directors: Lauren Shrigley, Jonathan Claxton, Jocelyn Sital-Singh Senior Account Managers: Joe Teal, Hattie White Account Executive: Clement Aro Advertising Manager: Carly Activille Group Advertising Director: Caroline Fenner Founder: Jolyon Connell Chief Executive, The…

3 мин.
politics

Controversy of the week The age of protest The world is in a rage. Across the globe, angry people are taking to the streets in vast numbers. Sometimes the proximate cause is a price hike: in India, it was of onions; in Chile, of the fares on the metro. In Lebanon, it was a new tax on using WhatsApp; in France, higher fuel duties sparked the gilets jaunes protests. But the protests elsewhere – in Hong Kong, Moscow, Barcelona, Algiers –are more overtly a response to political repression and corruption. A new age of revolution is upon us, and though the causes are various, they have a common thread, said Joshua Keating on Slate: austerity and the worsening inequality it brings. Globalised capitalism has increased prosperity for some, but many feel the…

1 мин.
spirit of the age

Unilever is saving hundreds of thousands of pounds a year by using an artificial intelligence system to assess candidates in job interviews. In the one-way video interviews now used by many large companies, candidates are sent questions and must record themselves answering them. Normally, a human recruiter then analyses the footage, but Unilever has invested in software that checks candidates’ facial expressions, body language and word choice, to look for traits deemed to be predictive of job success. Netflix has outraged many film directors by trialling a feature that will enable time-poor viewers to speed up films and TV shows. Using the “speed watch” facility, an hour-long show could be seen in 40 minutes.…

1 мин.
bad week for

Keith Vaz, the Labour MP, who faces being suspended from the Commons for allegedly meeting two male sex workers in his flat and offering to buy cocaine for them in 2016. The suspension was recommended by the Commons standards committee, which noted that the MP’s defence, that the men were there to discuss redecorating his flat, was “not believable and, indeed, ludicrous”. Smart motorways, after the chief executive of Highways England admitted the roads – which have a hard shoulder that can be used as a fourth lane during peak traffic periods – were too confusing, and that the scheme would not be rolled out further. Rory Stewart, who was accused of racism for describing three young black men he met in London on one of his walking tours as “minor gangsters”.…