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The Week

The Week V. 1259/1260

The Week covers the Best of the British and Foreign Media. With its non partisan reporting, The Week gives the reader an insight into all the the news, people, arts, drama, property, books and how the international media has reported it. This concise guide allows the reader to be up to date and have a wealth of knowledge to allow them to discuss all these key topics with their friends and peers.

Страна:
United Kingdom
Язык:
English
Издатель:
Dennis Publishing UK
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9 мин.
the main stories… …and how they were covered

What happened Johnson’s agenda Boris Johnson unveiled what he described as the “most radical Queen’s Speech in a generation” last week, setting out the Government’s agenda for the next five years. One of its most prominent measures is a bill enshrining in law the Government’s commitment to spend an extra £33.9bn ayear on the NHS by 2023-4. It’s due to be the first piece of legislation passed in 2020. The EU withdrawal bill is also scheduled for early next year. This will take the UK out of the EU on 31 January, put into law Johnson’s pledge to end the transition period in December 2020, and give British judges more power tooverturn rulings by the European Court of Justice. The Queen’s Speech also contained a promise to create a new commission to consider…

1 мин.
the week

Boris Johnson was humble in victory. Admittedly, he told Remain campaigners that they might now like to “put a sock in it”, but he also spoke of the long-standing Labour voters who must have wavered before putting their crosses in a Tory box, and vowed to reward their trust. At those words, some commentators breathed a sigh of relief. After a period when it seemed the liberal London mayor had morphed into an extreme right-winger, their Boris was back, they said. And yet, there has hardly been a Tory PM in the past few decades who has not, on coming to office, made heartwarming promises to unite the nation. Margaret Thatcher quoting St Francis of Assisi on the steps of Downing Street in 1979 – “where there is discord may…

1 мин.
the week

Editor-in-chief: Caroline Law Editor: Theo Tait Deputy editor: Harry Nicolle Executive editor: Laurence Earle City editor: Jane Lewis Editorial assistant: Asya Likhtman Contributing editors: Daniel Cohen, Thomas Hodgkinson, Simon Wilson, Rob McLuhan, Robin De Peyer, William Underhill, Catherine Heaney, Digby Warde-Aldam, Tom Yarwood, William Skidelsky Editorial staff: Anoushka Petit, Tigger Ridgwell, Sorcha Bradley, Aaron Drapkin Picture editor: Xandie Nutting Art director: Nathalie Fowler Sub-editor: Mary O’Sullivan Production editor: Alanna O’Connell Editorial chairman and co-founder: Jeremy O’Grady Production Manager: Maaya Mistry Production Executive: Sophie Griffin Newstrade Director: David Barker Direct Marketing Director: Abi Spooner Account Manager/Inserts: Jack Reader Classified: Henry Haselock, Rebecca Seetanah, Nicholas Fisher Account Directors: Lauren Shrigley, Jonathan Claxton, Hattie White Senior Account Manager: Joe Teal Sales Executive: Clement Aro Advertising Manager: Carly Activille Group Advertising Director: Caroline Fenner Founder: Jolyon Connell Chief Executive, The…

2 мин.
politics

Controversy of the week Is the BBC biased? Britain’s political culture may be bitterly divided, but at least all our leaders can agree on one thing, said Sean O’Grady in The Independent: “the BBC is institutionally biased against them. All of them.” Nigel Farage and Jo Swinson have both expressed fury at the way the Beeb has treated them. On the Labour left, it’s an article of faith that the BBC is “consciously” biased against Jeremy Corbyn – as the shadow transport minister Andy McDonald put it – and was partly to blame for its poor election result. The Tories, meanwhile, are so angry about the corporation’s election coverage that they are threatening to cut its funding. “Well, as BBC folk often reply, their critics cannot all be right.” In reality, in…

1 мин.
spirit of the age

Parents eager to foster in their children a love of computing helped make coding kits some of this Christmas’s bestselling toys. John Lewis says it increased its range of coding-based toys by a third, to meet expected demand, with the Osmo Little Genius Starter Kit among those on its hot holiday list. The London-based firm Kano says it has sold more than a million of its coding kits in five years. Google claimed back in 2014 that 93 million selfies were taken each day on its devices; now a London doctor says he is seeing an increasing number of young patients with “selfie wrist”. Dr Raj Ragoowansi reckons the repeated inward flexing of the wrist required for selfie-taking is behind a rise in patients with a form of carpal tunnel syndrome.…

1 мин.
good week for:

Vera Lynn, who managed to thwart an attempt to have her name used on a bottle of gin. Halewood International argued that “Vera Lynn” was cockney rhyming slang and that its customers wouldn’t associate it with the wartime singer, who is now 102. But at a hearing, the trademark officer was not persuaded. Maurizio Cattelan, the Italian artist, after he sold all three editions of his attention-grabbing conceptual piece Comedian – consisting of a fresh banana stuck to a wall with duct tape – for $120,000 to $150,000 each, at the Basel Art Fair in Miami. The banana is perishable, but the new owners get a certificate of authenticity, which allows them to replace it. Mariah Carey, after her festive classic All I Want For Christmas is You went to No. 1…