EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Boating & Aviation
Sailing World

Sailing World Summer 2019

Sailing World connects the community of racing sailors through words, images and shared experiences. Across many mediums, it explores the sailor’s passion and showcases the lifestyle, destinations and technology. It links knowledge-hungry participants to the sport’s top experts, providing unrivaled instructional content.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bonnier Corporation
Frequency:
Quarterly
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4 Issues

in this issue

6 min.
taken for a ride

On the exterior wall of the Santa Barbara YC is a notice board. Tacked to the cork is a flyer that reads in large letters: “Hitch Hiker Wet Wednesday.” If I’m looking to go sailing, I’m at the right place. It’s the middle of March, the air along California’s central coast is cool and the water cooler. The San Rafael Mountains are lush green and blooming after destructive wildfires and the rains that followed. It’s 3:30 in the afternoon, and like most California yacht clubs this time of year, the place is quiet, but the grills are set up and the yardarm is fluttering with burgees and signal flags Photographer Paul Todd and I follow instructions on the flyer, which explains that, if I’m interested in hitching a ride in the club’s…

4 min.
fresh arrivals

Jon Partridge plants his feet wide and firm on the asphalt, then leans into his cordless drill as its titanium bit gouges a hole into a blue metal mobile-storage rack. The bit screeches until it finally plunges into the frame’s hollow. One down, many more holes to go. He stands upright, arches his back to stretch, then pulls his cellphone from his pocket to take a call from the home office in England, many time zones away from San Diego. The skin on the back of his neck is flaking off in large pieces, seared from a week of assembling, shadowing and filming his brand-new fleet of keelboats. As one of three directors of powerhouse small-boat builder, RS Sailing, Partridge should be in a corner office back at HQ, but no,…

7 min.
a fleet in the forest

Upper St. Regis Lake, New York, is an off-the-beaten-path destination where members of St. Regis YC savor their anonymity. For more than 100 years, summer residents of this eclectic Adirondack enclave have combined a “great camp” lifestyle with a passion for a summer-long regatta. But the big news about this fleet in the forest is the ancient 32-foot one-design sloop that remains the club’s focal point. My interest in Idem sloops grew out of a chance encounter at a Safety at Sea Seminar in Larchmont, New York. A seminar attendee approached me during a break and asked if I’d ever heard of an Idem sloop. The sailboat and its name weren’t familiar, so I asked for further details. Ogden Reid introduced himself as a lifelong Idem sailor and summer resident of Upper…

8 min.
the influencer

A surreal emotion sweeps over me as I peel back the stiff canvas cover, exposing my Interlake to the warm July morning sun. The routine of rigging my boat before the day’s race will be the same as it’s always been, but this time, the experience will be different. Dad is no longer beside me, meticulously preparing the boat as he always did, checking control lines for chafe, inspecting every bit of hardware and gliding his hands over the foils to confirm their perfection. That’s how we would rig my Interlake together—until 2012, when cancer suddenly took him. It’s amazing how a simple sound can extract a memory from deep within. When I hear water slapping the Interlake’s flared bow, its hard chine sluicing through a choppy Sandusky Bay, just as…

5 min.
adult summer camp’s new home

The future was looking grim for Whidbey Island Race Week. The annual July invasion of the quiet confines of the Washington island’s Oak Harbor and Penn Cove was waning. What once decades ago numbered 150 boats petered to 60-something. Small boats couldn’t get launched because the city wouldn’t fix the crane. Bigger boats couldn’t get into the marina because the channel wasn’t dredged. National sponsors took a pass. It appeared the wind-delay water fights, shoreside volleyball and golf tournaments, epic bowling nights and bacon-offs in the campground would evaporate, as so many race weeks have around the country. But the soggy sailors of the Salish Sea had pulled the “Adult Summer Camp” from the jaws of death before and weren’t ready to give up on it now. Race Week owner Schelleen Rathkopf…

7 min.
small race electronics with big impacts

There is good reason, in the year 2019, to have some type of instrument on your small PHRF or one-design keelboat. New products offer a wide range of data and complexity, and when used correctly can help you start better, improve tactical decisions, and even help you with heel angle and crew positioning fore and aft. Which type of instrument is best for you depends on your budget and the level of complexity you desire. First, a few thoughts: As with most electronics, good data input equals good data output. For example, race committees generally talk about courses in magnetic heading and are often using analog compasses. Also, most of our smaller, simpler instruments read true heading because they don’t have the declination of the venue in which you are sailing.…