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Classic TrainsClassic Trains

Classic Trains December 2018

CELEBRATE THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN RAILROADING – WHEN GIANT STEAM LOCOMOTIVES, COLORFUL DIESELS AND STEAMLINERS SHARED THE RAILS. CLASSIC TRAINS COVERS THE 1930’S THROUGH THE 1970’S WITH REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHY, DETAILED REPORTING AND FIRST-HAND ACCOUNTS FROM PEOPLE WHO WORKED THE GREAT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAINS.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgivare:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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KÖP NUMMER
81,24 kr(Inkl. moms)
PRENUMERERA
253,69 kr(Inkl. moms)
4 Nummer

I DETTA NUMMER

access_time2 min
farewell to two giants

Two giants of rail photography have passed since our last issue. On August 7, Jim Shaughnessy, 84, died after an illness of several months. A lifetime resident of Troy, N.Y., Jim (a civil engineer by profession) took up the camera in the late 1940s. His credit line first appeared in TRAINS in 1952, and he soon established himself as a leading railroad lensman. He was also an author, penning major books on the Rutland and Delaware & Hudson as well as scores of articles, illustrated with his own photos, for TRAINS and other publications. Jim’s regular contributions to CLASSIC TRAINS, starting with our second issue (Summer 2000), led to “The Shaughnessy Files,” a series of 36 articles that began in 2007 and ends with his piece on the Quebec Central…

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head end

WE MISS… Concise locomotive model designations. The likes of today’s “SD70ACe (T4C)” and “MP40PHTT4AC” hardly roll off the tongue. Soo Line Classy FREIGHT POWER In the 1960s, passenger diesels idled by train-offs sometimes found work, at least for a while, on freights. Nickel Plate Road Alco PA No. 190 (above) leads Alco and EMD road-switchers on a westbound freight awaiting a highball at Bellevue, Ohio, on September 20, 1960. A dazzling five silver Burlington Route E5As and Bs (left) head up a southbound Colorado & Southern freight at Larkspur, Colo., in October 1967. Celebrities at Sunnyside Two notable members of the Pennsylvania’s GG1 fleet are together at Sunnyside Yard, New York, in September 1955. On the left in Tuscan red, waiting to back onto its train, is 4876, rebuilt two years previously after its spectacular runaway…

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reviews

Southland: Southern California Railroading in the Golden Age of Kodachrome Photos by Gordon Glattenberg, William H. Mills, and Tom Gildersleeve. White River Productions, Bucklin, Mo.; 877-787-2467. 256 pages. $79.95. A not-so-subtle theme wends its way through this magnificent book: if you’re not from Southern California, you’ll wish you were after losing yourself in this sun-splashed world of railroading from the early 1950s into the 1970s. Meticulously designed and beautifully printed, it says all there is to say about the wonders of the Santa Fe, Southern Pacific, Union Pacific, and a host of other railroads of that era as depicted by three masters of Kodachrome slide film. From the crowded urban districts of L.A. to the vast empty spaces of Cajon Pass, Tehachapi, and the Mojave, the 346 images present a dizzying array…

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riding the reading

The Reading’s Bethlehem Branch trains dusted my crib in Wyncote, Pa., so maybe it was ordained that I ride the first Iron Horse Ramble [“Rambling on the Reading,” page 20] from Wayne Junction to Shamokin on October 25, 1959. Great fun, even though I had to ride sideways due to lack of seating. I remember there was a distinct lack of safety concerns compared to today’s railroad excursions. There were photographers on top of buildings, freight cars, and signal masts; we leaned out of open vestibule doors. And at every town and crossing, there were hordes of people waving and enjoying steam railroading. — David Walter, West Chester, Pa. More on the Rambles I enjoyed your article on the Reading Rambles. While my parents were unable to take me on the Reading…

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how conrail became a classic

Since its launch at the beginning of 2000, this magazine has contended with a dilemma. It’s a nice problem to have, but it’s a dilemma nonetheless. Simply put: What is the classic era in railroading? When does it start? More importantly, when does it end? The answer was pretty clear in the first few issues. In his introductory note, Editor Rob McGonigal pledged to give readers a rich variety of stories and images related to “the middle four decades of the 20th century.” We generally understood those decades to be the 1930s through the 1960s. The magazine’s fast start out of the gate showed that readers agreed. Of course, history never hits the pause button, and what’s predictable and mundane today will be refreshing and nostalgic 20 years from now. It sounds…

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a uniquely positioned flag

The term “Fallen Flag” first appeared in Trains in 1974, as the title for a series of thumbnail histories of merged-away railroads. The series began with the Wabash, and employed the road’s flag emblem outline to illustrate the series’ opening pages. Editor David P. Morgan and I each wrote half the thumbnails. One of mine was the Wabash, which served my home territory, as in one of its slogans, “Serving the Heart of America.” I came to know the Wabash well for much of its last decade, before Norfolk & Western absorbed it in October 1964. Other than pacing a 2-8-2 south of Taylorville, Ill., circa 1950, I had only one Wabash experience before our family moved from suburban Chicago to suburban Detroit in 1956. And that was indirect — my…

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