UTFORSKABIBLIOTEK
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Bilar och motorcyklar
Classic TrainsClassic Trains

Classic Trains March 2018

CELEBRATE THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN RAILROADING – WHEN GIANT STEAM LOCOMOTIVES, COLORFUL DIESELS AND STEAMLINERS SHARED THE RAILS. CLASSIC TRAINS COVERS THE 1930’S THROUGH THE 1970’S WITH REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHY, DETAILED REPORTING AND FIRST-HAND ACCOUNTS FROM PEOPLE WHO WORKED THE GREAT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAINS.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgivare:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Läs merkeyboard_arrow_down
SPECIAL: Get 40% OFF with code: BIG40
KÖP NUMMER
81,24 kr(Inkl. moms)
PRENUMERERA
253,69 kr(Inkl. moms)
4 Nummer

I DETTA NUMMER

access_time1 min
steam bows out with a bang

Most of the dozen or so U.S. Class I railroads that continued regular steam operations after the end of 1957 did so in locations and on assignments that were far from the public eye. That was just fine with some roads, especially those that had announced their total dieselization, only to quietly reactivate some steam engines when traffic surged. When the end finally came, it often came in places like Williamson, W.Va. (N&W); Douglas, Ariz. (SP); or Centralia, Ill. (CB&Q), as lonely, dirty power brought transfers or mine runs into terminals for the final time. In this regard, the Grand Trunk Western stands out. For one thing, it was among the last members of that elite Class I club to sideline steam, doing so in late March 1960. Also, GTW kept…

access_time2 min
head end

WE MISSd... Graffiti-free freight cars. Though not exactly colorful, this UP train east of Cheyenne in 1959 looks neat and orderly — as a train should. B&O’s long drink of water With a capacity of 23 tons coal and 22,000 gallons water, this 2-8-2’s tender was 63 feet long — 16 feet more than the engine itself. Previously paired with a 2-8-8-0, it’s seen here at Lester, Ohio, on March 21, 1957, with Q-3 Mike 325 on the Seville–Lorain local, a run that, because of the closure of the water station here, required an outsized tank. PRR and NYC: Not so different after all? As we mark the 50th anniversary of the Penn Central merger [pages 12 and 40], we’re reminded of the many and major differences between the two protagonists. These two photos, taken…

access_time2 min
reviews

Indianapolis Union and Belt Railroads By Jeffrey Darbee. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Ind. 248 pages. $45. What makes a great railroad city truly great? Credit usually goes to the big trunk lines, but as this handsome book proves, sometimes greatness is writ small. That’s the case in Indianapolis, where even mighty NYC and PRR (plus B&O, IC, NKP, and Monon) depended on two small switching roads, the Indianapolis Union and Indianapolis Belt. Author Darbee’s highly readable text shows how the IU made possible the first great big-city union station. He traces the Belt’s origins in the stockyard business and its eventual role in keeping freight moving across the city. You don’t have to be a Hoosier to fall under the city’s spell, thanks in part to a generous mix of first-rate photos…

access_time1 min
visit us on the web

ClassicTrainsMag.com Sounds of steam on the Grand Trunk Western Listen to tracks from Detroit Division, an album of stirring GTW steam sounds recorded in 1959, accompanied by a photo gallery of GTW steam in action. Podcast Our newest online feature, the “Tales of the Rails” podcast presents true stories of adventure as experienced by railfans and railroaders during the golden years of railroading. Blog Read the weekly blog by our columnist Kevin Keefe, who reflects on the places he’s been, the people he’s met, and how railroading’s history impacts the industry today. Photo of the Day Our most popular feature! View a new photo from our vast collection every day. Magazine subscribers have access to the full archive of more than 1,500 images. Follow us on Facebook…

access_time10 min
getting the “nips” to the prr

Letters from readers on our Winter 2017 issue Regarding the late William Warden’s “Off-Loading at Little Creek” [page 76], into the 1960s this was the interchange point for the Norfolk Southern Railway and the Pennsylvania Railroad. A major commodity southward was automobile frames from Reading, Pa., for the General Motors assembly plant in Doraville, Ga., via the NS to Charlotte, then the Southern Railway, which avoided the restrictive clearances of the Pennsy’s Baltimore tunnels. Northward, NS delivered 10-car cuts of phosphate bound ultimately for Valleyfield, Quebec. NS train 98 had to arrive at its Carolina Yard in Norfolk in time for cars destined for the Pennsy to be inspected, classified, and taken 6 miles (above) to Little Creek before the 4 p.m. cutoff time for PRR’s “D-2” float to Cape Charles…

access_time5 min
there had to be a penn central

I doubt many readers of Classic Trains require an introduction to the Penn Central, given its lingering impact on just about every aspect of today’s railroad scene. You might even wince at the sound of the railroad’s name, such was the gloomy trajectory of its short history. But a quick thumbnail refresher is in order. The basic facts are stark. On February 1, 1968, two standard-bearing railroads combined in what was up to that point the largest corporate merger in American history. They were ancient enemies, the Pennsylvania and the New York Central, but by the 1960s they, like all railroads in the Northeast, had been pushed into a corner by a declining industrial base, burdensome passenger service, the unforgiving economics of the short haul, and, arching over everything, the stifling…

help