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Classic TrainsClassic Trains

Classic Trains September 2018

CELEBRATE THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN RAILROADING – WHEN GIANT STEAM LOCOMOTIVES, COLORFUL DIESELS AND STEAMLINERS SHARED THE RAILS. CLASSIC TRAINS COVERS THE 1930’S THROUGH THE 1970’S WITH REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHY, DETAILED REPORTING AND FIRST-HAND ACCOUNTS FROM PEOPLE WHO WORKED THE GREAT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAINS.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgivare:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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KÖP NUMMER
94,98 kr(Inkl. moms)
PRENUMERERA
296,58 kr(Inkl. moms)
4 Nummer

I DETTA NUMMER

access_time2 min
first encounter with steam

Those of you who grew up in the 1950s or before might not remember the first time you saw a steam locomotive. After all, one’s first encounter with something that’s commonplace tends not to make an impression.By the time I was born, steam had retreated to a few pockets of the North American railroad network. Although my life technically did overlap the steam era, I was too young to remember it, and I was nowhere near the active engines, anyway.Which means that I was old enough, and steam was rare enough, for me to remember my first encounter. The day was June 14, 1964; the location was the Reading’s Jenkintown station north of Philadelphia; and the engine was T-1 4-8-4 No. 2100, heading an Iron Horse Ramble trip to Hershey,…

access_time4 min
head end

WE MISS…Brakeshoe smoke. Dynamic brakes on diesels have largely clensed Horseshoe Curve and other grades of braking’s sights and smells. Bruce D. FalesBudd car bonanzaCanadian Pacific’s 54 RDC1s, 2s, 3s, and 4s constituted the world’s second-largest fleet of Budd Rail Diesel Cars (a distant second — Boston & Maine had twice as many). The CP deployed its Budds from coast to coast on services ranging from single-car rural accommodations to impressive commuter consists. This 11-car assemblage is eastbound train 248 approaching Montreal West station on August 15, 1974. Hugh J. RowlandBath time for GP40sFour GP40s ease through the wash rack at the Milwaukee Road’s big Bensenville Yard in Chicago on September 27, 1969. Judging by their appearance, the far two units are more than ready for their time in the shower.…

access_time11 min
raritan river in steam

Back-to-back steam engines, and two yellow cabooses, show the pre-diesel Raritan River.Seeing the tribute to the Raritan River as “True Color” [page 14] made me think how the line affected the late noted photographer Tom Donahue’s plans in the mid-1950s. Steam disappeared in 1952 on his home road, the New Haven, so he spent most of his vacation time traveling around North America to document steam before it ended. Raritan River was an early stop for him. Above is one of his slides taken before the line dieselized in 1954. He rarely labeled his slides, but this seems to be at the Sayreville Junction–South Amboy end of the railroad.— John Garofalo, Fairfield, Conn.Short lines, pro and conYour shortline theme was a lot of fun. My favorite line was the local…

access_time5 min
when steam rocked the stereo

The little stereo in the corner of my parents’ living room was what an audiophile would call extremely low end, just a simple turntable married to a pair of cheap speakers.But, oh, what wonders it could reproduce! Especially when I curled up on the floor in front of it one evening in late 1964. I was 13, and my favorite Christmas gift that year was a so-called deluxe record album, an “LP” in Sixties parlance, given to me by my aunt and uncle in Philadelphia.Where they lived was important. What came out of those speakers wasn’t music — it was the mesmerizing sounds of Pennsylvania Railroad steam locomotives, a boxed set of an LP and an illustrated 16-page booklet, produced by Ralbar Productions in cooperation with the railroad. My relatives…

access_time1 min
reefers under wire

PRODUCE TRAFFIC & TRAINSThere’s more about refrigerator cars and their precious cargoes in the new book Produce Traffic & Trains, available at KalmbachHobbyStore.com ■…

access_time12 min
“the j” returns to its origins

If you wanted to accomplish something in railroading during the Gilded Age, it helped to have the house of J. Pierpont Morgan behind you. Chicagoan Philip B. Shumway learned this in 1887. He had invested in the Joliet, Aurora & Northern, proposed to run between those two Illinois towns, with the idea of it becoming a belt line encircling the increasingly congested Chicago terminal. He found financing to finish the 22-mile pike in 1886, but JA&N had sparse traffic and the lender refused to fund the belt line.Shumway turned to Drexel, Morgan & Co. and received the opposite reception. The House of Morgan took over JA&N, creating the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway (commonly, “the J”) on March 18, 1887, and hiring Shumway to build out his dream. Sadly, Shumway…

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