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CQ Amateur Radio

CQ Amateur Radio November 2018

CQ is the magazine for active hams, with a focus on the practical. Every article is clearly written and aimed at involving you, the reader...whether it's a story of operating from some exotic location, an article to deepen your understanding of ham radio science and technology, or a fun-to-build project that will have practical use in your ham shack. Join us on our monthly journey through the broad and varied landscape of the world's most fascinating hobby!

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgivare:
CQ Communications, Inc.
Antal:
Monthly
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KÖP NUMMER
55,47 kr(Inkl. moms)
PRENUMERERA
277,80 kr(Inkl. moms)
12 Nummer

i detta nummer

9 min
announcements

NOVEMBER ENID, OKLAHOMA — The Enid Amateur Radio Club will hold the 2018 Enid Hamfest beginning 8 a.m., Saturday, November 3 at the Garfield County Fairgrounds-Hoover Building, 302 E. Oxford Avenue. Contact: Bill, W5EIY, (580) 716-4788. Email: <nokes3139@gmail.com>. Website: <www.enidarc.org>. Talk-in 147.375+, 444.825+, 145.290-. VE exams. INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI — The Raytown Amateur Radio Club will hold its 2018 Hamfest from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, November 3 at the American Legion Post 21, 16701 East U.S. 40 Highway. Contact: Dan, KCØNYT, (816) 674-8854. Email: <dlcole640@gmail.com>. Website: <www.k0gq.com>. Talk-in 145.17-. VE exams. LAKEWOOD, COLORADO — The 285 TechConnect Radio Club will hold the 2018 Fall TechFest from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, November 3 at The Bridge Church at Bear Creek, 3101 S. Kipling Street. Website: <www.na0tc.org>. Talk-in 145.145- (PL 107.2). LAWRENCEVILLE, GEORGIA…

5 min
ham radio news

FCC Cracks Down on Uncertified VHF/UHF Gear, With Hams Caught in the Middle The FCC has issued a broad warning to importers, retailers and users of certain “low-cost two-way VHF/UHF radios that do not comply with the FCC’s (equipment certification) rules … and are frequently imported into the United States.” These include some brands and models that are popular among hams. The FCC points out that devices that operate “only on frequencies that the FCC has allocated for use by Amateur Radio Service licensees, do not require FCC equipment authorization, and an amateur licensee may use his or her license to operate such radios.” However, the same paragraph notes that “(i)f a two-way VHF/UHF radio is capable of operating outside of the amateur frequency bands, it cannot be imported, advertised, sold,…

5 min
zero bias: a cq editorial

Birds, Butterflies and Hams Citizen science is big and growing, fueled in large part by the internet’s ability to connect many people in many places to central points for gathering data. More and more scientists are coming to appreciate the value of observations made and reported by large numbers of individuals in hundreds or thousands of locations. At the same time, individual non-scientists are learning that by collecting and reporting information on topics of interest to them, they can make a meaningful contribution to the body of scientific knowledge. Hams have been involved with citizen science since before it had a name, starting with the ARRL-sponsored transatlantic tests in the 1920s, continuing through the CQ-led Radio Amateur Scientific Observations program in the late ‘40s and early ‘50s to current-day research into various…

6 min
our readers say:

Landing Whales… Editor, CQ: When I turned to page 36 (in the August 2018 issue of CQ) and read “Landing Whales on Wet String” by Michael J. Charteris, VK4QS/VK4XQM, my heart jumped with joy because I was reminded of (the) CQWW CW (Contest) coming up in November. In some ways, CQWW CW is easier for us “nonpros” than some of the lesser contests. If the conditions are right for CQWW CW, I will have two or three stations call my target before it comes my turn to call the target and there is plenty of chance to get the call right and speed is not a factor. Also, like Michael, contact count is not that important to me. The other point that hit home is that I have read several books on…

11 min
build a raspberry pi 3 panadapter

A panadapter is a device connected to your receiver that allows you to see activity around the frequency where your receiver is tuned. In QST for February 2017, I described a panadapter using an SDR dongle, laptop with HDSDR, or a smartphone/tablet and a $10 app, but was never very happy with it. I figured a Raspberry Pi computer could work but didn’t know how to write the required software. I subsequently found the perfect software described on YouTube and built a dedicated panadapter using the same hardware but with a smaller display. The Pi 3 uses free software called GQRX that was written by Alexandru Csete, OZ9AEC, in Denmark. To see it in action, search GQRX in YouTube. Photos A and B show the unit in operation and all…

1 min
parts list

Raspberry Pi 3, 2.5 A power supply/wall wart, stick-on heatsinks – Amazon, CanaKit Raspberry Pi 3 with 2.5 A Micro USB Power Supply, $43 16 GB class 10 micro SD card, Walmart, etc. $10 NooElec or other brand, RTL2832U & R820T2 Tuner SDR – Amazon, $20 7-inch HDMI display, Elecrow HDMI TFT LCD Display 1024 x 600, Amazon item #646381, $70 Upconverter (only required if your IF is less than 53 MHz), Amazon, NooElec Ham It Up v1.3, $40 Right angle micro USB cable, Amazon, StarTech UUSBHAUB6RA, 6 feet long, USB-A to Right Angle Micro USB-B (only required if your configuration/cabinet space needs a low profile connection for power to the display), $5.50 HDMI-to-HDMI 6-inch cable, Amazon, Monoprice 113574 Ultra Slim series High Speed HDMI cable, (only required if your configuration/cabinet needs a low-profile connection between…