Decanter April 2021

Published by TI Media Limited The world’s best wine magazine. It is simply the “wine bible”. Every month it provides recommendations on the world’s finest wines and tells you where you can find them. From top Bordeaux to the best value wine on the shelf, Decanter guides you through a maze of wine to help you find the right wine for you. It also offers interviews with leading wine personalities, in-depth guides to the wine regions and the latest wine news.

Land:
United Kingdom
Språk:
English
Utgivare:
Future Publishing Ltd
Antal:
Monthly
76,47 kr(Inkl. moms)
434,07 kr(Inkl. moms)
12 Nummer

i detta nummer

1 min
welcome

As the new custodian of Decanter, I should introduce myself. I’m a journalist and editor of many years experience, and over my career I’ve launched, worked on and run a few things you might have heard of, from Fleet Street newspapers to big-selling magazines, global awards and respected websites. But I have never felt so simultaneously honoured and apprehensive as I do now. Decanter – now a rich website, a splendid magazine, and much more – is a very special thing. Its history began nearly a half-century ago, in 1975, and since then it has hosted many of the greatest wine writers of our time. There is a depth of wisdom here which is rare, and to be greatly treasured. In an age when attention spans are measured in milliseconds, a publication…

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5 min
a month in wine

Bordeaux gives go-ahead for new grapes Six ‘new’ grape varieties that could help Bordeaux châteaux fight climate change have been provisionally approved for use, as St-Emilion wineries join forces to build an anti-hail defence system (below). France’s national appellation body, INAO, approved six varieties proposed for use by producers of Bordeaux AP and Supérieur wines. It’s potentially a major move, although the reality of adapting to climate change is extremely complex. Touriga Nacional is among four red wine varieties on the list, and it needs little introduction to Port lovers and fans of Portuguese wine in general. The other three are Castets, Arinarnoa and Marselan, the last of which is a crossing between Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache Noir and has enjoyed success in China in recent years. Two white wine varieties, Alvarinho and Liliorila,…

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1 min
in brief

South Africa’s government has partially lifted an alcohol sales ban, imposed due to Covid-19. Trade body Vinpro welcomed the move but said intermittent bans since March 2020 have cost the industry 8 billion rand (£390m) in direct sales. MD Rico Basson said it was ‘too late for some businesses’, while excess supply in some winery cellars would mean ‘tough decisions’ as the 2021 harvest began. Fifth growth Château du Tertre has been sold by the Albada Jelgersma family, which will focus on fellow Margaux estate Giscours and Caiarossa in Tuscany. Alexander van Beek, MD for the wineries, said there is ‘enormous determination to really put Giscours where it belongs’. The Helfrich family bought du Tertre with a ‘French institutional investor’, which acquired the land. Michelin has named 54 new one-star…

3 min
your letters

The wine diet I’d like to see calorie and other nutritional information on wine labels. Ideally, wine and alcohol aren’t a part of a healthy diet but, hey, we nutrition-conscious still like to partake in adult beverages from time to time! Micki Winsor, by email Pinot price inflation So, the 2019 en primeur Burgundy campaign has been and pretty much gone, the prices of most wines are slightly ridiculous and I’ve dipped my toe in again and bought a couple of wines that hopefully will provide enjoyable drinking in the future. I say hopefully, because Burgundy seems to be the perennial wine region for unpredictability and imaginative prices. It always seems to have been thus and the wines sell, so I guess everyone is happy? But I wonder... Do we all enjoy shelling out in…

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1 min
letter of the month

Guessing game Congratulations on your enlightening article, ‘Sulphur dioxide in wine: the great debate’ (February 2021). I work in wine retail and am regularly asked for wines that don’t contain sulphites by customers who are unaware that all wines contain some, even if in very small quantities. Many consumers also wrongly believe that organic and biodynamic wines are sulphite free. A quick glance at the green leaf-shaped EU logo on the back label and they are sold. But is it surprising that consumers are so misinformed when labels carry such little information about what is actually in the wine? Producers know the exact quantity of sulphites in their wine, so why aren’t they required to state it on the label? Regular readers of Decanter are now better informed, but more transparency…

3 min
andrew jefford

Something strange is going on, at least in France. We’re all beneficiaries. And when we try to account for this strangeness, it’s hard not to think of a blonde-haired girl and three bowls of breakfast porridge. More on Goldilocks later. Heat is the issue, and its effect on vintage quality. It won’t have escaped the attention of Decanter readers that we are into an amazing six-vintage run in most French regions since 2015, with only 2017 letting the side down. It’s early to call 2020, but first signs are encouraging: good to great, let’s provisionally say, with growers in Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Loire, Alsace and northern Rhône all thrilled with results. 2019 looks plausibly great too, and unquestionably very good in every region, with almost no exceptions; both 2019 and 2020 are,…

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