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Sailing World

Sailing World Winter 2020

Sailing World connects the community of racing sailors through words, images and shared experiences. Across many mediums, it explores the sailor’s passion and showcases the lifestyle, destinations and technology. It links knowledge-hungry participants to the sport’s top experts, providing unrivaled instructional content.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgivare:
Bonnier Corporation
Antal:
Quarterly
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KÖP NUMMER
55,47 kr(Inkl. moms)
PRENUMERERA
138,63 kr(Inkl. moms)
4 Nummer

i detta nummer

7 min
ladies night

For the first race of the midsummer’s Wednesday night jib-and-main J/22 racing, I rock up like some wannabe professional coach. I’ve got my red Spinlock PFD zipped up, a handheld VHF tucked inside, and a ditty bag with the essentials: course chart, knife, soft shackle, Sharpie, notepad and pencil, and a roll of yellow electrical tape. I’m here to mentor three eager ladies into Sailboat Racing 101. Dana, my wife, has raced with me a few times over the years, so she generally knows what to do, but her good friends Lee Ann and Heather are green as can be. The summer before, the three of them, all school teachers, had banded together to take sailing lessons every Wednesday night. It was fun, they said, but they didn’t learn that much.…

5 min
the spirit of speed

Harvey Jones raced wooden boats in and around New England for more than two decades, but the enthusiast of classic yachts had never conceived, designed or built his own boat from scratch. Doing so had long been on his bucket list, however, so in 2018 the 65-year-old tech-industry pioneer finally decided to make it happen. After reading an article about a wood-and-composite cruising boat grand-prix designer Marcelino Botin commissioned for himself and his wife, Jones was inspired. “I recognized that he was as able to design beautiful classic cruising boats as he is fast boats, so I thought that’s a great combination.” An email to the designer in Spain and a “yes” from Botin resulted in Outlier, an aggressive yet elegant design that immediately drew the admiration and ire of the highly…

8 min
members only

The “Members Only” syndicate, formed by Jay Cross, Hannah Swett and Brian Kinney, won the first major regatta for the new one-design IC37 keelboat class. While they began the season as the team to beat, poor results in subsequent events bumped them to dark-horse status going into the National Championship in late September. After three days and eight close races, however, the syndicate and their teammates put themselves back atop the class, winning the championship in the final race of the regatta. “At the beginning of the season, none of the teams had sailed the boats before,” Kinney says. “We were fortunate that we won the first event, but had some mis-steps; so it was a bit of a redemption to come back and win the big event. It was one…

7 min
because the martins win the party

My first introduction to the Martin 242 was the Sailing Life ARK Regatta in Vancouver in the earlier 1980s where the now-defunct local magazine held a sail-off regatta among the region’s top one-design keelboats. There were J/24s, M242s, Dragons, Thunderbirds and a few others I can’t recall. Competitors chosen to race the boats were local hotshots—including yours truly, a 22-year-old Laser prodigy about to get into a Star Class campaign in a big way. Let’s just say I wasn’t much of a hotshot keelboat sailor at the time, and eventually a series of photos emerged, with me steering a 242 for the first time. In one picture I’m looking back at the camera with a big grin. The next photo shows the boat carving into a wind-ward death roll because I…

7 min
the mighty one

The breeze increases to 15 knots on the final upwind leg, and we’re leading the fleet at the 2019 ILYA A Scow Championship on Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin. After winning the previous race, another windy one, my teammates aboard Jud Dayton’s Instigator are feeling the pain. The mainsheet in my hands bears the load of a 350-square-foot sail attached to a 38-foot carbon mast. When the gusts hit, I watch the spar thrash as we depower as much as possible. The cut on my finger leaves a blood trail from my clothes to the top deck of the boat. I can feel every inch of sail cloth in my lower back as I strain to get the last few inches of trim. My feet are locked into the hiking straps, and my…

7 min
a lesson plan

It’s a noisy August night in a tent full of jackets and ties at Great Harbor YC. Fourteen champion tacticians flank the podium, waiting to learn which skipper bid for them in the silent auction. As the checks are counted for the benefit of Nantucket Community Sailing, Dawn Riley introduces us with some friendly heckling and one by one we’re paired and dispatched to dinner with the team we’ll spend the next two days with aboard an International One-Design keelboat. I join Team ’71, anchored by Cornell sailing team classmates of that year, Ted Moore and regatta co-chair Chris Gould. They’ve brought along two relative youngsters, Skip Beck and Phil Cox, but looking around the tent, our average age is up there. There’s plenty of race experience around the table—Olympic and…