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Trains

Trains

December 2020

TRAINS IS THE #1 MAGAZINE AMONG RAILROAD ENTHUSIASTS! EACH ISSUE IS PACKED WITH PROBING FEATURES, RAILROAD NEWS, EXPERT COMMENTARY, CUTTING-EDGE INDUSTRY REPORTS, DETAILED MAPS AND SPECTACULAR PHOTOGRAPHY COVERING RAILROADING’S INFLUENTIAL HISTORY AND EXCITING FUTURE.

Land:
United States
Språk:
English
Utgivare:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Antal:
Monthly
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KÖP NUMMER
66,32 kr(Inkl. moms)
PRENUMERERA
407,90 kr(Inkl. moms)
12 Nummer

i detta nummer

1 min
from the editor

jwrinn@kalmbach.com @TrainsMagazine @trains_magazine It’s hard to imagine with American freight railroading so robust that it was on the ropes 50 years ago and only found redemption 40 years ago with deregulation. In this issue, we pause to reflect on the day that railroading fell apart — the fateful day the Penn Central went bankrupt. We look back at the inside story behind the medicine it took to revive an industry — getting heavy-handed regulation of the business. For those of us old enough to remember, those were difficult days, and there was a question mark about the future of even the best lines. For younger readers, Rush Loving’s stories in this issue will enlighten you. PC’s bankruptcy and deregulation were pivotal events that set the stage for what we have today.…

1 min
obituaries

J. DAVID INGLES, whose 47 years with Kalmbach Media included serving as editor of Trains magazine from 1987 to 1992, died Oct. 4 after a brief illness. He was 79. The son and grandson of railroaders, Ingles was a lifelong rail enthusiast. He grew up in Homewood, Ill., and Dearborn, Mich. After college and a stint as a newspaper reporter in Springfield, Ill., he joined Trains in 1971 as associate editor. He became editor upon the retirement of David P. Morgan, a position he held until he became the magazine’s senior editor. He retired from Trains as senior editor in 2005, but continued in that role for Classic Trains until 2018, when he transitioned to contributing editor, the position he held at the time of his death. His 47 years at…

10 min
still seeking speed

Union Pacific signal crews are ready. On June 25, 2020, they are positioned at every highway crossing for about 8 miles north of Normal, Ill. An Amtrak train with an instrumented Horizon cafe and heritage sleeper Pacific Bend, sandwiched between two P42 locomotives, carries technicians testing the efficacy and reliability of Alstom’s Incremental Train Control System, ITCS, and Wabtec’s positive train control Interoperable Electronic Train Management System, I-ETMS. The train blasts north at 90 mph while UP electronic techs monitor components in silver trackside equipment cabinets. Flaggers make sure road traffic is protected, just in case the line’s four-quadrant gates fail to lower before the juggernaut reaches each crossing. Once the end of the segment is reached, the engineer stops the test train, moves to the rear locomotive, and again cranks…

1 min
speed with safety

FOUR-QUADRANT GATES, pavement loop circuits connected to the ITCS system, and fencing through urban areas are required by Illinois Commerce Commission regulations, but they aren’t the only safety devices used or tried on the 110-mph-capable sections of the Chicago-St. Louis Corridor or in Michigan. Here’s a look at some previous and current safety features attempted or in use today.…

1 min
canyon light

A QUIET SATURDAY EVENING is stirred by a southbound Orange Line train headed to Midway Airport, as a steady snow begins to fall at the Adams/Wabash station in the South Loop of Chicago on Dec. 10, 2016. The dark canyon wall of century-old buildings, for a brief second, turn into day as the train’s electric current pickup shoes arc skyward into the night. Moments later the train’s metallic symphony fades and night’s slumber returns. After the fire of 1871 destroyed the entire heart of a youthful city, Chicago embarked on an unprecedented building boom born of a combination of technological advances in construction and the introduction of the streetcar along State Street. Twenty years later, engineers completed the design for the first integrated, intracity transportation system comprised of a loop elevated…

16 min
the day railroading fell apart

It was a rainy afternoon, Sunday, June 21, 50 years ago, when Penn Central Corp., parent of the nation’s largest railroad, plunged into bankruptcy. At the time, it was the biggest bankruptcy filing in history. Penn Central was the nation’s eighth largest company with $7 billion in assets. It was a staggering sum at the time, equivalent to seven times that today. The railroad had been founded just over two years earlier as part of a merger movement that had swept the industry in hopes of saving the nation’s railroads from Penn Central’s fate. The root cause: overregulation. The federal Interstate Commerce Commission was notorious for bending to the demands of state and local governments, shippers, and even labor unions. It delayed and even forbade attempts to abandon excess facilities or raise…