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Adweek

Adweek November 4, 2019

The all-new Adweek features news and information for marketing, media and advertising professionals that you can’t find anywhere else. Each issue includes profiles and interviews with top newsmakers, critiques of hot ad campaigns, the latest trends in print, digital and advertising and much more.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Adweek, LLC
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33 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

2 min.
brandweek spotlight

Adweek: How do you navigate marketing and advertising in an age of rapid consumer feedback? Pedro Earp: We are relentlessly committed to bringing people together by building a portfolio of brands that people love. We do this through deep consumer understanding anchored in data and empathy, purposeful brands that impact people’s lives, and harnessing new connection models that inspire brand affinity. We have defined key areas where new technologies will help us drive increased sales uplift, efficiencies and simplification. We’re changing the ways we interact with people with content that is authentic and contextualized. What’s the biggest buzzword in the industry today and how are you preparing for it? Disruption. Data, technology and innovation bring us closer to consumers around the world and help us drive business growth. Innovation drives not…

1 min.
in adweek history june 30, 1980

In 1978, video game maker Taito launched Space Invaders in Japan. A revolution in game design after the limited joys of Pong, Space Invaders was an immediate hit, spawning arcades that stocked nothing but Tatio’s machines where players spent hours defending the world from an endless alien invasion. Two years later, Atari brought the game to the U.S., receiving top billing in our coverage of the 1980 Consumer Electronics Show in Chicago. There, the firm revealed its campaign would go beyond the usual TV buys to include the National Space Invaders Superbowl. Thousands played at four regional sites, marking the first competitive gaming event and the precursor to today’s massive esports tourneys held in arenas and livestreamed to worldwide audiences. While kids lined up at shopping malls to achieve Space Invaders glory in…

3 min.
the stars are aligned

Visit Palm Springs and you’ll find stars of all kinds—be they luminous points in the dark night sky or classic haunts and hotels that radiate glimmers of Ol’ Blue Eyes and his Rat Pack crew. This week, California’s desert oasis will shine even brighter, as 700 marketing stars gather for our second annual Brandweek summit, our Brand Genius Awards gala and our inaugural Constellation Awards Ball. Beginning each summer, senior editor Robert Klara oversees the process of meticulously curating a lengthy list of Brand Genius nominees whose marketing efforts over the past 18 months were not only ambitious and impactful but also measurable. Once again, Adweek’s editors had their hands full selecting this year’s class of 10 Brand Genius Award winners, each of whom boasts an array of remarkable accomplishments across…

4 min.
no echo heard in china

The U.S. has one of the most advanced smart speaker markets in the world, dominated by a who’s who of Big Tech that includes Amazon, Apple and Google. That isn’t necessarily the case abroad, though, particularly in the fast-growing Chinese market, where local players such as online commerce company Alibaba, search engine Baidu and consumer electronics company Xiaomi hold sway. In fact, Baidu sent shock waves through the industry earlier this year when analytics firm Canalys announced it shipped 4.5 million smart speakers in Q2, which was second only to the 6.6 million shipped by Amazon. That marks a growth of 3,700% for Baidu’s Xiaodu smart devices, which came out a year prior. Not surprisingly, Chris Apostle, chief media officer at digital marketing agency iCrossing, said 3,700% is probably not a sustainable…

1 min.
star power

First it was John Legend and Chrissy Teigen. Then Samuel L. Jackson. Now Issa Rae. | Google and Amazon are using celebrity voices more as a fun perk for U.S. customers. Google offers celebrity voices for free, but for a limited time. Customers have to pay for Amazon’s Jackson skill, but then it becomes theirs forever. | It’s a practice that dates back to at least 2015, with Google subsidiary Waze and Stephen Colbert. More recently, DJ Khaled signed on to be another limited-time voice on Waze. Khaled is sponsored by French streaming service Deezer, so the use of celebrity voices with voice tech has become a marketing opportunity.…

3 min.
chatting with the bots

It may seem like chatbots are designed to make us go crazy at times. But new research from Publicis Media shows that the ones that are genuinely helpful are moving the needle for brands in positive ways. “When a brand gets a chatbot experience right—by making it easy to use, helpful and fun—it has the power to drive brand preferences in a way that isn’t true for mobile websites and apps,” said Vanessa Evans, svp, analytics and insights at Publicis. New research shows that friction-free chatbots drove a significant increase in the “likely to recommend” brand preference metric with an 8% lift versus mobile websites and apps. That’s just one of several Publicis findings from implicit association testing (measuring unconscious or automatic associations) of 800 U.S. participants, conducted in association with Sentient…