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Tech & Gaming
Australian HiFi

Australian HiFi July - August 2016

Australian HiFi is the definitive magazine for discerning listeners and Hi-Fi enthusiasts. Every issue is packed with equipment and music reviews, new product information and ‘how-to’ articles. Australian Hi-Fi magazine is dedicated to helping you find the best quality sound for your home.

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Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Bimonthly
SUBSCRIBE
$20.94
7 Issues

in this issue

3 min.
crowd-funded hi-fi equipment: what could possibly go wrong?

It costs a lot of money to get an electronic hi-fi product to market. So much money that in the past only very large companies—or very dedicated individuals—were able to manage it. These days, thanks to the modern miracle that is crowd-funding, anyone can raise the money to build a product, often within only a few days. No more need for expensive bank loans or pesky shareholders or worse, demanding business partners. Just crowd-fund it. That’s what a company called Kreyos did when it thought a waterproof, voice-activated smart watch would be a good idea. Lots of ordinary people also thought it would be a good idea too, and quickly contributed $US1.5 million (using the Indiegogo platform) towards building that watch. But when the company finally delivered the watch to its…

2 min.
densen b-130+ integrated

Following its success with its award-winning Densen B-110 and B-150 integrated amplifiers, Danish manufacturer Densen has introduced the B-130+ integrated amplifier, which is priced midway between the B-110 and B-150, at $4,990. As with all Densen amplifiers, the B-130+ does not use overall feedback and has separately regulated power supplies for the output transistors, drivers, preamp and microprocessor, though all are fed by a massive toroidal transformer and a 90,000µF capacitor bank. Almost all components are modern surface-mount types including Vishay metal-film resistors, custom-made capacitors, and Vima film capacitors, so that each channel’s printed circuit board is around the size of a credit card. ‘Thanks to the PCB being so small, we have been able to minimize EFI distortion, as well as create a much faster than normal circuit,’ said Thomas…

1 min.
hifiman edition x

New York’s Hifiman has become best known for its planar magnetic (or orthodynamic) headphones but its founder, Dr Fang, was also a passionate pioneer in the high-end portable player market, releasing its first HM-801 player back in 2010, several years before Astell&Kern, say, brought its first AK100 player to market. Hifiman today offers portable players, amplification electronics and planar magnetic headphones, including the latest iterations of well-regarded designs including the HE-400, HE-500 and HE-6, and most recently the range-topping HE1000 ($4,749 RRP). In Australia, the Hifiman Edition X retails for $2,799 (RRP) from Addicted To Audio. ‘The Edition X is a reference headphone with all the remarkable detail, imaging, and ergonomic comfort for which Dr Fang and Hifiman are known,’ said Billy Ross, of Addicted to Audio, ‘plus it’s also a…

2 min.
ps audio directstream junior

It seems that some high-end manufacturers are concerned that their high prices are not only putting off new customers, but also disenfranchising their existing customers. That was certainly the case with PS Audio’s DirectStream DAC, as acknowledged by PS Audio’s founder and owner, Paul McGowan, who told Australian Hi-Fi Magazine that not all his customers could afford one. ‘The advanced FPGA and pure DSD technology employed in DirectStream meant that it was the most expensive DAC we’d ever made, and many loyal PS customers had to sit on the sidelines, priced out of the market,’ he said. ‘So a few months after the DirectStream was launched, Ted [Ted Smith, designer of the DirectStream] was tasked to begin work on a lower-priced version code-named ‘Junior’, that had to have a similar…

2 min.
keith monks discovery microlight

The Keith Monks MicroLight record-cleaning machine is now available in Australia. Keith Monks says the new microLight is not only the smallest record-cleaning machine it’s ever made, but also: ‘the smallest precision record cleaning machine ever made, at just 390mm wide.’ Its acrylic exterior nominally allows you to see its inside workings, but by inserting a high-definition image behind the acrylic, and switching on the internal illumination, you can make the microLight look like whatever you want. ‘Keith Monks is working with a growing number of fine artists and photographers from their Isle of Wight UK and US bases, together with a specialist print company, to develop a unique layered acrylic printing process and create exclusive limited editions and one-off custom print options,’ says Steve Harris, the company’s publicist. The new…

1 min.
hegel h360 streamer/amplifier

Hegel has tried to make sure its new 250-watt per channel H360 streamer/amplifier is a complete entertainment hub by including not only balanced and unbalanced analogue inputs, plus a home theatre bypass, but also optical and coaxial digital inputs, a USB input for any signal up to DSD128 and Ethernet connectivity. Hegel says that the H360 delivers 250-watts per channel into 8 and 420-watts per channel into 4 with a damping factor of more than 4,000. Frequency response is rated at 5Hz–180kHz, with signal-to-noise at more than 100dB. Although you’d never guess just by looking at the minimalist front panel, the H360 functions as a pre-amplifier (thanks to line outputs), power amplifier and USB DAC. As a streamer, it supports Apple AirPlay and DLNA, plus the USB input supports all formats…