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BIKE India November 2020

BIKE India has fixed that urge with a truly adrenaline-pumping passion magazine that caters as much to the super-bike fanatic as to man-on-the-road commuter. Dedicated in its entirety to the country’s burgeoning biker community, the magazine is emerging as a biker’s bible, not just in India, but across Asia. BIKE India magazine is produced by die-hard motorcycle enthusiasts with over 25 years of hands-on experience, who strive to deliver unbiased and extensive reviews of latest two-wheelers produced across the globe.

Country:
India
Language:
English
Publisher:
Next Gen Publishing Limited
Frequency:
Monthly
$1.48
$6.46
6 Issues

in this issue

1 min
looking forward to festive boost

WE ARE IN THE MIDST OF THE FESTIVE SEASON AND WE HOPE TO SEE A SURGE IN two-wheeler sales following the prolonged slump due to the countrywide lockdown. It was during this period of lockdown that India moved from BS4 to BS6 and because of that we are re-testing all the existing bikes for performance figures. Some interesting facts have emerged from these tests. While most of the bikes have become slower, surprisingly some have become quicker. While most have gone for an additional catalytic converter in the exhaust bend-pipe, some have managed to achieve the emission figures with a single cat in the silencer. There is only one industrialist in the country who has the guts to call a spade a spade and that is Rajiv Bajaj who has once again…

bikein2011_article_008_01_01
14 min
the most accessible triple

TRIUMPH INDIA ARE ALL SET TO WRITE A new chapter in their Indian journey. It is no secret that they have been working on a neo-retro naked motorcycle with a triple-cylinder engine, called the Trident. Is the Trident all-new? Yes and no. The name is iconic and can be traced back to 1968 when it first appeared. During its tenure in the Isle of Man Tourist Trophy, the motorcycle earned the nickname “Slippery Sam” and won the Production class five times in a row from 1971 to 1975. Then the name surfaced once again in 1990, adorning the 750- and 900-cc triple-cylinder roadsters. Now, in the 21st century, the Triumph Trident has resurfaced yet again as a 660-cc triple. In its latest avatar, this motorcycle aims to be one of the…

bikein2011_article_012_01_01
1 min
snippets

Suzuki Scooters Get Smart The Suzuk Access 125 and Burgman Street now get a Bluetooth-enabled digital console which allows the rider to sync his/her mobile phone with the scooter’s console. It provides turn-by-turn navigation, calls, SMS and WhatsApp alerts, estimated time of arrival, missed calls and caller ID, speed warning, and phone battery charge-level display. The ‘Suzuki Ride Connect’ app is exclusively available for Android users as of now. The updated Access 125 is priced between Rs 77,700 and Rs 78,600, while the Burgman Street 125 costs Rs 84,600 (all prices ex-showroom). Power.Global EV Start-up Enters India Power.Global, an America EV start-up, led in India by industry veteran Pankaj Dubey, plans to offer clean and affordable battery conversion kits for existing two- and three-wheelers. The goal is to introduce 100 per cent designed and…

bikein2011_article_015_01_01
1 min
collaboration between levi’s and royal enfield

Levi’s x Royal Enfield 511 Slim Fit - Pro Jeans These motorcycle jeans are made of Cordura + Tough max fabric for enhanced abrasion-resistance and come with pockets for knee and hip armour. Thoughtful design details include easy-access zip pockets, high-visibility reflective tape, and reinforced seat for extra strength. These Bikeratti D3O protectors would cost another Rs 2,590 (approx). The 511 Slim Fit Jeans offer a modern look with room to move, thus making them ideal for your ride. Levi’s x Royal Enfield Western Shirt A perfect choice whether you are on road or off it, this is a classic Barstow western denim shirt with active stretch, Cordura-reinforced elbow panels, adjustable cuffs, and high-visibility reflective tape. This shirt makes for a perfect companion to go with the Pro Jeans. Bikeratti D3O Knee Protectors…

bikein2011_article_018_01_01
2 min
readers write

Bike for College Commute I have a dilemma. Which one should I buy: the Royal Enfield 350 Classic BS6 or Standard? From your point of view, which one is better? I need it because I want to go to college which involves a 60-kilometre commute. Which of these two motorcycles will be better suited to my requirement? Nischay, via social media Dear Nischay, Thanks for writing in. That’s a tough choice. We haven’t ridden the BS6 Standard yet, but we have been testing the Classic 350 BS6. You can take a look at the review in this very issue. Since both bikes are built on the same platform, the only difference will be that the Classic doesn’t come with a pillion seat, while the Standard does. Otherwise, the changes are purely visual. So, if…

bikein2011_article_019_01_01
2 min
lubricating the chain

I need help with a technical question. How often must one lube the chain? Do you have any tips for doing it the right way? Also, is there any problem with using those chain lube sprays? My mechanic suggested that using the spray would be detrimental in the long run, but I suspect he just wanted to make sure he didn’t lose his business, because then I would no longer have to go to him to lubricate the chain of my motorcycle. Please throw light on this issue. Harshal P, by e-mail Dear Harshal, As a rule of thumb, you should lube your chain every 500 kilometres and more frequently if you ride in wet weather or go off-roading a lot. Before lubricating the chain, make sure that you thoroughly rid it of…