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BILLIONAIRE 09 - The Future Issue

BILLIONAIRE is an award-winning magazine not available on newsstands, but offered to a distinguished group of the most powerful, influential, high net worth readers across the world. Join them to receive special subscriber-only invitations. We go the extra mile to report on important topics such as the future of technology, world health, philanthropy and humanitarian work. We bring you incredible travel experiences, the very best in elegant living, the arts, culture and craftsmanship. We exclusively interview some of the world’s most illustrious billionaires, from Ted Turner to Nicky Oppenheimer to Joe Gebbia to Mo Ibrahim, about the problems keeping them up at night, their passions and projects. We speak to some of the planet’s most inspiring change-makers, from Jimmy Carter to Buzz Aldrin to Kofi Annan, about their visions for the future and how they are making the world a better place. Each quarterly issue of BILLIONAIRE is carefully curated with unique content that other magazines simply do not offer.

Country:
Singapore
Language:
English
Publisher:
Highend Pte Ltd
Frequency:
Quarterly
$40.34
$161.37
4 Issues

in this issue

2 min
a word from the ceo

Seldom do I read newspapers but on the morning of 4 June 2012, at The Mark in Manhattan, the breakfast staff decided that my jet-lagged gaze should be broken with The Wall Street Journal. Not being in a mental state to graciously decline the offer, I took the paper, removed the first section (who wants to start the day with such negativity?) and tried to get my eyes and mind to focus on what lay before me. The article titled ‘Exhausting the Earth’s resources? Not so fast’ was what grabbed my attention. John W Miller quoted statistics that showed we had 46.2 years of oil extraction until we would run out. Not so fast! I lifted my tired head and looked around the furiously air-conditioned room to see whether panic had…

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2 min
editor’s note

If the future is looking a little bleak to you right now, you're not alone. But the great thing about the future is that we have the power to change it. In this issue of Billionaire we look at the ways our world could evolve and how individuals are shaping the future for the better. For example, the patent unsustainability of our food supply is a major world threat, with livestock agriculture the biggest polluter on the planet. We look at how a largely vegetarian diet (p74) or plant-based meat alternatives, such as that produced by Beyond Meat (p86), as well as up-cycling binned food (p80), could change our trajectory. In our interview with astronaut Buzz Aldrin (p38), he makes his NASA-backed argument that we will be ready to move humans to…

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1 min
our planet

As we look at the future of the planet and how fast ecosystems are changing, the Arctic landscape should be our focal point. Everything that happens past the polar circle dramatically impacts the rest of the world: rising sea levels; a change of currents and dominant winds leading to tornadoes; the future of food (deterioration of fish population and accessibility to fresh water); the exponential impact of fossil fuels, and so on. The Arctic shouldn’t be protected just for the sake of polar bears but for the sake of our whole planet, as our biggest reservoir of natural resources. The healthier the Arctic, the stronger the resilience of our planet. By definition, global climate change is reflected in a host of changes all over the planet, yet those happening in the…

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4 min
farewell to the arctic

“Time is different in Greenland; it is linked to our survival instincts, to understanding the unknown, to accepting that we depend on others. Out there, we are all confronted by a feeling of helplessness”— Bo Lidegaard. “Immaqa, Immaqa,” says our dog-sledge driver looking out beyond the immaculate, frozen horizon. As a foreigner entering the icy kingdom of Greenland’s giant ice cap, it takes a new mindset to understand the broad meaning of the word ‘immaqa’; in Greenlandic it means something like “maybe, let’s see”, “maybe, let’s wait”, or a combination of both. Everything in Greenland is ruled by uncertainty — the weather is unpredictable and with it goes flight schedules, deliveries and so on. And, as climate change steps into the bigger picture, the seasons are not what they used to…

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5 min
planet plastic

An ‘accidental monument to modern society’ as one writer named it, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, discovered 20 years ago, is a vast, floating dumping ground where the planet’s plastic waste has gathered and is slowly degrading. This enormous gyre, of which there are four others, are, in layman’s terms, vortexes, where sea currents converge and therefore attract discarded plastics from the Pacific coasts of North America, Canada, Mexico and Southeast Asia. The consequences for maritime eco-systems are dire and getting worse. Plastic is breaking down into minute particles and gradually entering the food chain. And that’s bad news for all of us. For several decades, scientists, environmentalists and oceanographers have deliberated over how to conquer this. Most involve a painfully slow and prohibitively expensive method of dredging plastic with trawlers,…

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3 min
breathing trees and sugar plants

…and back on land A man-made, oxygen-making leaf Julian Melchiorri, founder and CEO of biotechnology start-up Arborea, has invented and produced the first man-made biological leaf. It is built from biological materials and harnesses one of the most ancient chemical processes on the planet: photosynthesis. “It’s an artificial structure made of bio-stabilising silk proteins that contain photosynthesising chloroplasts. The chloroplasts convert CO2 into breathable oxygen, using only water and light,” says Melchiorri. Showcased at the 2016 World Economic Forum, Melchiorri’s breakthrough is based on a pressing need to address the challenge of increased carbon-dioxide emissions and rising global warming. Arborea is a clean-tech start-up based at the Imperial College Incubator in London. It has developed what it calls Carbon-Bio-Converter (CBC) technology, based on algal micro-organisms that leverage the natural process of photosynthesis. This…

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