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BladeBlade

Blade April 2019

BLADE magazine is the world’s #1 knife publication, covering all aspects of the industry: knifemaking, how-to’s, collecting, legislation and knife rights, and much more. Inside each issue you’ll find: Coverage of the hottest and most collectible handmade knives and their values Complete listings of the industry's most important shows and events Knife collecting tips from the experts The most up-to-date knife legislation info

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Caribou Media, LLC
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$27.65
13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
readers respond

How to Walk the Dog As I’m walking the puppy around the farm this a.m., I was thinking of all the ongoing knife stuff. Regarding “Ivories Under Fire Again” (page 74, December BLADE®), I would not want an elephant killed for the ivory to go on my knife handle. If the elephant dies of natural causes, a piece of the ivory on my knife handle would be great. As BLADE Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Fame® member Buster Warenski once said, there is nothing more elegant than ivory. There’s got to be some logical reasoning on this issue. Hang the ones that kill the elephants just for the ivory. Knives illegal with ivory handles, with blades too long, with double edges, with push buttons, and on and on—there just seems to be no end to…

access_time1 min.
cover story

Made circa 1992, the Viking Dagger by the late Jim Schmidt is a classic example of the brilliant knifemaking, forging and fileworking talent that Schmidt was. Schmidt’s backlog was such that it was extremely difficult for him to accept new custom orders, though he made an exception for the Viking Dagger. The fact that it was in a style that was new for him at the time made it even more challenging—and, being the artistic genius he was, he loved challenges. He forged the ladder-pattern damascus blade from 203 and W2 carbon steels. A small dagger is hidden in the ancient walrus ivory handle. The cover knife’s overall length: 15.75 inches. It comes with a beautiful sheath with frog and floral-engraved button. In all, the knife took Schmidt six months to complete. An…

access_time3 min.
end of two eras

An era officially ended with the recent passing of Jim Merritt, a passing that presages the end of another era as well. Admired by many in the custom knife fraternity, Merritt died Dec. 28. He was known for working for many years with BLADE Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Fame® member Bob Loveless in the Loveless shop in the making of the world-famous and widely coveted Loveless custom knives. Loveless made his first knife in 1954 in a legendary career that spanned the following 56 years. Merritt joined Loveless in 1982, continuing a tradition of Loveless employing other makers to help in the building of Loveless knives, a tradition that began in 1971 with Steve Johnson. Johnson worked with Loveless until 1974. That tradition also included Kuzan Oda, who assisted Loveless in the making…

access_time10 min.
the quiet man

Sometimes a memory casts a long shadow across the lives and histories of others. However, in the case of Jim Schmidt there is no shadow—only a bright, never-flickering light of quiet strength, humanity, patience, and an oh-so spectacular gift for making dazzling custom knives. There is no argument when it comes to Schmidt’s place in the pantheon of legendary custom knifemakers. Though he left us too soon on the day before The Knifemakers’ Guild Show in 2000, he packed a tremendous amount of living into 60 years, personified the term “Renaissance Man,” and left an enduring legacy among family, friends, students and those he mentored in the art that he loved best. In 1981 Schmidt was one of the first six men ever to achieve the rating of American Bladesmith Society master…

access_time1 min.
the knife i carry

“This is my CRKT M16-14T that I named Salvation, since it was a Costco parking lot rescue. I love the knife’s size-to-weight ratio. It’s big enough to get any job done but light enough that I don’t notice it in my pocket. From stripping wire to cutting bands, this one does it all.” Damien Parish, Fort Wayne, Indiana “I carry a Buck 373 Trio. I love the small stockman pattern. It does it all in a compact package.” Mike Smith, a letter via e-mail “I go nowhere without my Hogue X5. The combination of the flipper and the button lock along with the state-of-the-art design gives it the ultimate in the cool factor.” Simone Phillips, a letter via e-mail For the latest knives, knife news, trends and more visit blademag.com , BLADE®’s popular Instagram page at…

access_time1 min.
win a knife!

Tell us what knife you carry. Add a little history or an anecdote. Try to include a photograph—if digital, at least 600 KB but no larger than 2 MB—of you with your knife. We will publish your comments in an upcoming “The Knife I Carry.” Your name will then be entered in a drawing to win a free, high-quality, name-brand knife. The drawing will be May 15. Mail to: BLADE , POB 789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789, or e-mail steve@blademag.com. If you send your entry by e-mail, please include your physical mailing address in case you win the knife.…

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