EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
CAR UK

CAR UK

June 2020

Every month CAR interviews the stars of motorsport, demystifies the latest in-car technology and shares our writers’ passion for car culture and car design. Discover the world’s newest and most exciting cars: join us to drive everything from supercars and hot hatches to family cars.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
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12 Issues

in this issue

3 min.
welcome

Last month I wrote about the fact that, with making memories in cars effectively on pause, it was a time for looking back. Plenty of you got in touch with your driving memories. You’ll find just a couple of them here. Apologies for the down-sized issue this month; we’ll be back up to our normal size very soon. Please note too that all our UK drives were conducted prior to lockdown. And please consider a subscription if you’re struggling to find us in the shops. Just head over to the www.greatmagazines.co.uk website, or you can access us on your phone or tablet by downloading our app from the Apple or Android stores. Stay well, and enjoy the issue. My best drive? May 11, 1983, driving from Dundee to Doncaster listening to Aberdeen defeat…

11 min.
the day car making stood still

Adrian Hallmark recalls the last time he set foot in Bentley’s Pyms Lane factory; it was on the Tuesday after British industry submitted to the coronavirus pandemic and silenced its plants. ‘It was an eerie feeling. Every car on the line was covered with plastic bags,’ recalls the company’s chairman and CEO. ‘A few people were in the final rework area with maybe eight cars. Everybody I spoke to, they were gutted. ‘For two years we’d been building up to go for a record year, and people had put in enormous effort and energy to get us into that position. Ultimately, it’s “only” business, it’s not like losing somebody to Covid-19. But to have it ripped away, everybody was disappointed, frustrated.’ On a typical day at Bentley’s Crewe headquarters, some 4400 people would…

2 min.
german giants gloomy… buyers not buying… tesla the exception to every rule

What unites the pandemic responses from the German industry’s chiefs? Panic. At BMW, Oliver Zipse is keen to re-focus on hardware and forget grand talk about being a service provider. At Audi, Markus Duesmann is considering saving the doomed TT and R8; they may be niche products, but at least they’re distinctive and admired. Merc’s Ola Källenius is having serious doubts about car sharing and hydrogen fuel cells for passenger cars. VW’s Herbert Diess, meanwhile, is lobbying for a softening or delaying of the inevitable huge penalties for not meeting CO2 targets. Even consumers who expect to hold on to their jobs are in no mood to spend on new cars. Many are now much more likely to hang on to what they’ve got, in some cases extending their lease with…

2 min.
crunch time for next performance peugeot

Factfile POWERTRAIN 50kWh battery, 168bhp (est) e-motor, front-wheel drive CHASSIS Steel and aluminium monocoque DUE 2021 1 LEX LUTHOR CALLED… …he wants the kryptonite back. Peugeot’s hot electric 208 will use plenty of green detailing in a colour named after Superman’s one weakness. The project hasn’t been signed off yet, but boss Imparato and 208 project manager Guillaume Clerc want it to happen. The plan is for all Peugeot Sport cars to use the colour. 2 POWER STRUGGLE At the e-208’s launch, project manager Rémi Seimpere said the 50kWh battery filled all the available space. That means extra shove will have to come from fitting a more powerful electric motor drawing from the same battery, sacrificing some of the regular e-208’s range. 3 PLUGGED-IN ROLLOUT The Peugeot Sport sub-brand will all be electrified. Plug-in hybrid, non-Sport versions of the 508, 3008 and…

4 min.
‘who do you think you are?’

Legend. Hero. An inspiration. When Sir Stirling Moss passed away on Easter Sunday, plenty of superlatives were used to eulogise him, and all were fitting. Moss was one of the few sportsmen to transcend his chosen field, as known to the wider world as Woods, Federer or Bolt, even decades beyond his active career. He wasn’t just admired by petrolheads either – he was the wider world’s hero too. Here’s why. 1 THE FIRST REAL PRO Moss was barely into his 20s when he began his professional racing career (the nickname ‘Boy Wonder’ would stick with him), but in mentality and approach he was arguably the sport’s first professional driver. One of the first to take fitness seriously and to cultivate his own brand, endorsing commercial products, he shifted F1 from gentleman’s…

2 min.
bringing its b-(suv) game

Toyota is bringing the bravado in a way we haven’t been used to seeing from the Japanese giant in recent years. Not only is it convinced it started the SUV trend with the original RAV4 25 years ago, it’s practically guaranteeing its new Yaris Cross will be a massive sales success. Making a baby SUV is a pretty easy recipe: use the platform from a supermini (in this case Toyota’s GA-B architecture from the latest Yaris); lift the ride height (it’s 30mm taller than the Yaris); and graft on some chunky styling cues inspired by the other SUVs in your range. The new car’s blocky wheelarches, down-turned face and horizontal rear lights are all seen on the current RAV4. Given Toyota’s wholesale addiction to hybrid powertrains, you won’t be surprised to learn…