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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Classic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains December 2018

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$10.74
$53.75
8 Issues

in this issue

2 min
need specific structures?

There are a lot of great-looking buildings on our City Terminal & Transfer layout (see page 32). While they all come from different manufacturers, they do have one feature in common: They’re all factory assembled – just take them out of the box and plant them on the layout. However, there are times you may want a structure you can’t buy in a store. In these cases, you’ll need to make it yourself – and if you don’t know how, you’ll need advice from an expert. That’s where Eric White and David Popp come in. They belong to the MR Video Plus team of go-to guys for building models of things that no one else makes. They have a variety of construction projects available on MRVP to teach you the tips and…

4 min
christmas magic

Back in the pre- and postwar years, exposure to trains was a given. Boys and girls craved toy trains because they saw real trains on an almost daily basis. As passenger train travel began to fade in the 1950s, interest in toy trains began to wane. Toy and model trains, especially O gauge, began to see growth only in the collector market. The hobby needed a shot in the arm. It needed a miracle. That miracle arrived in 2004, when The Polar Express movie hit theaters across the nation. Almost overnight youngsters again had trains on their minds. Lionel wisely acquired the licensing rights to The Polar Express, and it has been producing Polar Express trains and accessories ever since. For a long time, Lionel’s Polar Express models were O-27 toy trains.…

13 min
spotlighting scarce trains

Among the hobbyists specializing in collecting Lionel trains from the postwar era, Bob Ford stands in the forefront. Therefore, when turning the spotlight on his collection, we faced the challenge of selecting which among his hundreds of noteworthy trains should be included. Outfits, both cataloged and promotional, might reasonably be the focus. And Bob has dozens of them! But more intriguing were the scarce Lionel items from postwar years Bob has acquired over the past four decades, including engineering prototypes, paint samples, and desirable models produced in small quantities. A SIMPLE START There’s a tendency among toy train enthusiasts, especially newcomers, to assume the most advanced collectors started early in their quest to obtain the best. Meaning, they almost certainly received top-of-the-line sets when they were children and have never looked back. Bob laughs…

3 min
flying hi

Nothing says “toy trains” quite like the colorful prewar tinplate creations by Lionel, Ives, Marx, and others. Although lacking the finer detail of postwar offerings, the simple sheet-metal bodies of the locomotives and rolling stock from that earlier era have a wonderfully rugged charm. The latest offering from MTH Electric Trains’ Lionel Corporation Tinplate line is the prewar-style no. 11-80059 boxcab electric locomotive in Milwaukee Road colors and matching no. 11-80059 three-car passenger set. Although both the engine and passenger cars have been in the reproduction lineup for several years, this is the first time the models have been offered in the maroon and orange colors reminiscent of the Milwaukee Road’s Olympian Hiawatha. ENGINE IN THE LEAD The no. 256 locomotive is a two-motored electric engine. First released by Lionel in 1924, the 256…

8 min
bringing up dad

Advertising executives at Lionel during the postwar era firmly believed in the power of their electric trains. What sort of power? The power to save fathers overwhelmed by their professional and civic responsibilities from neglecting their families. That is heady stuff to digest more than half a century later. Except the scenario described here continues to reflect reality. If you’re dubious about this assertion, just check out the attractive 8 x 16-foot three-rail layout constructed jointly by Michael Pellegrino and his son, Aidan. Real credit for handling the tasks associated with developing a superb model railroad belongs, according to Michael, to his enthusiastic and industrious offspring. Simple beginning Whenever magazine readers in the 1950s viewed illustrations of the fathers enjoying Lionel trains with their children there was a clear understanding that those middle-aged men had…

3 min
american flyer’s no. k5418t passenger set

FEATURES 1 No. 303 Reading Lines 4-4-2 Atlantic steam engine and tender (with red glowing smoke and “choo-choo” sound) 2 No. 960C American Flyer Lines Columbus baggage and club car (satin silver with chestnut stripes) 3 No. 962C American Flyer Lines Hamilton Vista-Dome car (satin silver with chestnut stripes) 4 No. 963C American Flyer Lines Washington observation car (satin silver with chestnut stripes) Christmas promised a new electric train for thousands of lucky kids in the 1950s. Not surprisingly, most boys and girls selecting an O or S gauge set chose a freight train. Whether led by a steam engine or a diesel, its array of cars offered lots of play value. There was more to do with a set containing boxcars, gondolas, flatcars, or hoppers than one with some passenger cars. All the same, the…