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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Classic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains July 2018

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$12.08
$53.75
8 Issues

in this issue

5 min
lots of loco!

By commercial standards, the Alco PA diesel could best be called a magnificent failure. Oh, the carbody design was unique to Alco – it was as distinctive among diesels as EMD’s FT or F3 was to steamers. It was also streamlined in a muscular way. It appeared more powerful than graceful. The carbody was a great canvas for virtually any railroad’s livery: Santa Fe’s warbonnet, New York Central’s lightning stripes, and Southern Pacific’s Daylight livery all looked larger than life on a PA. The model was produced as both PA (cab unit) and PB (cabless booster) models between 1946 and 1953, and nearly 300 were built. Not all that impressive during the mad rush to dieselize, but soon the Alcos could be found at the head of many prized passenger trains. Although 17…

3 min
photo album

GEORGE FLANAGAN’S O GAUGE LAYOUT The creek catches your attention first, thanks to the strands of ice and bare branches along its banks. George Flanagan created the murky waters to leave the powerful impression of an industrial town in decline, with pollution and uncertainty characterizing life there. Then, of course, you note the pair of Norfolk Southern SD70M-2 road diesels braking around the curve. George, whose O gauge layout will be showcased in an upcoming issue of Classic Toy Trains, has lightly weathered his MTH models so they fit with the general environment he’s modeling on his Linganore Valley RR in New Market, Md. CHRISTOPHER DE AUGUSTINE’S O GAUGE LAYOUT Every engineer knows the pleasures of sitting in the cab of a powerful locomotive as it rolls along a beautifully maintained route under…

2 min
the sky’s the limit!

Color is one of the most important elements in layout design. It creates depth and space. Once you know the guidelines of using color, you will be able to create realistic skies and clouds and add a sense of distance in a modest amount of space. Figure 1 shows the basics. The colors become lighter and less saturated as the scene moves from foreground to background. Distant edges should be softer, and there should be a reduction in detail. You are seeking higher contrast and brighter color in the foreground, with lower contrast and color in the background. Do you want to include a bright orange warehouse? Place it up front and not along the backdrop! Of all the color issues model railroaders face, the sky is often the most challenging. I have…

1 min
six steps to better clouds

1 Establish a light blue sky. Always use a matte finish paint! 2 Clouds are best achieved by spraying rather than brushing. An aerosol can of white automotive primer works well. Be sure to wear an approved spray mask. 3 Make a stencil from cardboard – 18 x 24 inches is a good size. Cut out multiple shapes using a sharp hobby knife. Aim for lumpy and slightly exaggerated cloud shapes. 4 Hold the stencil 3 to 6 inches from the surface, and spray lightly with white paint, as shown in Fig. 4. 5 Keep the stencil moving with a slight rotation as you’re spraying. 6 This final step is optional and rather tricky, but it can yield spectacular results. Invert the stencil and add underlying shadows to the clouds, using light gray spray primer.…

2 min
a cheap track cleaner, knuckle-coupler version

EDITOR’S NOTE In our October 2013 Tips column, Harry Noble showed how to make a simple track cleaner using a Marx truck with tab-and-slot couplers. Here, he adds a variation to the project by using a Marx knuckle coupler instead of a tab-and-slot type. The basic bits and pieces I originally used were a Marx Type F truck and a handful of parts. These included a Marx tab-and-slot coupler (rivet mounted), an O gauge wheel-set, a 2 x 3-inch piece of cotton flannel, a 1¾-inch length of quarter-round wood trim molding, a no. 4 x ⅜-inch round, a Phillips-head wood screw, and a no. 6-32 x ⅜-inch slotted-head machine screw with a nut. I folded the cleaning pad over the quarter-round trim and attached the cloth-covered wood trim to the truck using the…

6 min
the joy of billb oards

Throughout the post-World War II period and ever since, layout builders have used miniature billboards to add realism while providing viewers with doses of visual enjoyment and hints of nostalgia. Outdoor advertising consistently improves O and S gauge rural and urban scenes, regardless of whether it involves plain yet colorful images or animated signage. Lionel launched a trend in layout development that really took off during the 1950s and has never lost speed. The firm’s chief rivals, American Flyer and Marx, joined in with billboards of their own. Then in the modern era of production, some more elaborate models made their debut, leading to the illuminated animation of today. FROM STANDARD GAUGE TO S The ongoing history of toy train billboards, which marched steadily throughout the postwar period, started at a crawl over…