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Classic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains November 2017

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$12.08
$53.75
8 Issues

in this issue

3 min
the generations of toy trains

Welcome to the 30th anniversary issue of Classic Toy Trains magazine! To mark the occasion we have assembled a remarkable set of stories. They cover many topics, but are united by a single theme: The generations of trains. What do we mean? For most of us, our interest in O and S gauge trains was sparked by the childhood gift of an electric train. Our enjoyment of these colorful and durable models continued through the passing decades, to the point where, perhaps, there are children or grandchildren to share the hobby with us. We asked readers to send their memories of growing up with toy trains. The response was overwhelming! These entertaining and nostalgic stories start on page 34. Reading them reminded me of some great times in my own life, and…

2 min
childhood trains and mischief

Robert Blalock’s memorable childhood visit to the Lionel showroom in the early 1950s was the subject of an article in the February 2017 Classic Toy Trains. His first train from 1952 is still in his family and was recently overhauled and returned to service by Dave Lykens, who also took this photo. The boy who visited Lionel At left is a recent photograph of Robert Blalock and the Lionel train he has enjoyed since the early 1950s. Robert is the 8-year-old whose trip to New York City was described in “Visiting the Lionel showroom in 1952” in the February 2017 Classic Toy Trains. He received his first Lionel train that same year. Robert is now 73. I spent a few days making his childhood train usable again. While quite a bit of work…

3 min
photo album

YOUR PICTURES WILLIAM NOVAK’S S GAUGE LAYOUT This American Flyer no. 326 New York Central 4-6-4 Hudson has been handling passenger trains for William Novak since it was a pup back in the 1950s – when he was still a pup! And, Bill reports, the steamer has never disappointed him, right up to the present, when it handles trains on his S gauge Mystic, Lackawanna & Western RR, which he built in Arlington, Va. Some vintage Flyer accessories, including the no. 591 crossing gate in the foreground, add character to his 8½ x 14-foot railroad, soon to be the subject of a feature article in Classic Toy Trains. FORREST JEROME’S O GAUGE LAYOUT Dismissing freight trains from the 20 x 21-foot O gauge railroad constructed by Forrest Jerome has never struck him as viable.…

4 min
product news

ROLL WITH HOLIDAY STYLE: One of the most visible demonstrations of holiday spirit continues to be the Canadian Pacific’s Christmas train. The train features gaily illuminated rolling stock that annually rolls through CP territory. MTH offers a set of four 50-foot RailKing double door plugged boxcars that feature flashing LED holiday lights. The four-car set, no. 30-7087, operates on O-31 or wider diameter track and costs $319.95. See your MTH retailer or go to www.mthtrains.com. DON’T DODGE THIS TROLLEY: Grzyboski Trains is offering a new custom-run trolley car made by Lionel. The no. 58275 Laurel Line motoroized trolley salutes 40 years of Grzyboski’s Train shop. The O gauge car features bumper-controlled reverse action, interior illumination, a traction tire, two adjustable trolley poles, and operating LED headlights, and is O-27 ready. The…

4 min
popping springs?

QI recently was given a Lionel no. 2331 Virginian Train Master diesel. It is in good shape on the outside, but doesn’t run. I want to remove the brushplate to clean the brushes and commutator, but worry about creating problems. Will the spring pop out once I take off the brush assembly? As long as the spring and brush do not pop out, I think I can handle cleaning the brushes and commutator. –Tony Morell, Broadheadsville, Pa. AThe brushes will pop out, but the springs will remain attached. If the springs do come out, you have another problem to address as either they are incorrectly installed or are broken. Regardless, replacements are available and the new parts are fairly easy to install. DEAD K-LINE HORN Q I have a K-Line no. K2499-0052 O…

3 min
american flyer’s no. 107 terminal station

Structures have always been the great reconciler among toy train enthusiasts. No matter how ardent hobbyists might be about the gauge or manufacturer preferred, they generally tolerated blending the stations and houses on their layout. Heck, some kids and adults went out of their way to buy a variety of metal, cardstock, or plastic buildings for towns. A reason for such an openminded approach came down to the fact that the dimensions of many prewar and postwar toy structures hardly kept to scale. The size of a depot, bungalow, or switch tower might cause it to look believable to S or O gauge modelers. Wasn’t that the central virtue of the buildings developed for the Plasticville U.S.A. line by Bachmann Bros.? The same held true with platforms and newsstands marketed by Mini-…