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Classic Toy Trains

Classic Toy Trains October 2017

CLASSIC TOY TRAINS BRINGS YOU O AND S GAUGE FOR THE OPERATOR AND COLLECTOR. SEE THE NEWEST TRAINS FROM LIONEL, MTH, ATLAS O AND OTHERS; LEARN ABOUT TRACK PLANNING, WIRING AND LAYOUT CONSTRUCTION; IDENTIFY AND REPAIR OLD LIONEL AND AMERICAN FLYER TRAINS; AND VISIT THE MOST INSPIRING TOY TRAIN LAYOUTS EVER BUILT.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$12.08
$53.75
8 Issues

in this issue

5 min
the sports model from emd

There have been many oddball locomotives built in the diesel era, some small and some very large. But few are viewed as such a whimsical product as the BL2 from the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors. Over the years I have heard the words “ugly” and “homely” applied to this eccentric-looking engine, but I’d argue it is one stylish, sweet ride Today, we all have an idea what of a road switcher should look like. Back in the 1940s, though, the concept was far from set in stone. Coming from the time of the Aerotrain, the Train of Tomorrow, and the GM Superliner bus, the BL2 evoked the flair of an era of chrome, fins, and streamlining. The concept of the locomotive was for branch-line operation (hence the BL in the name).…

2 min
personalize your layout

When he wrote “Logging + O Gauge = Serendipity” in the December 2006 issue of Classic Toy Trains, Senior Editor Roger Carp said American author Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) would have been delighted by my 6 x 10-foot Serendip & Western RR, an O gauge logging layout set in the late 19th century. After all, Twain’s literary creations Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn dreamed of “lighting out for the territories west of the Mississippi River.” What then became of Tom, Huck, and Becky Thatcher and the other stalwarts as they grew up? In planning a subsequent expansion of my home O gauge layout, I decided they had matured, assumed adult responsibilities, and found homes on my Serendip & Western. It seemed reasonable to assign Twain’s characters to various businesses, structures, and railroad cars.…

11 min
lionel trains for 1967

Since Lionel’s emergence in 1900, its products had earned an enviable reputation in the American toy industry for quality craftsmanship, dependability, safety, and durability. Lionel said it best when it promoted its electric train outfits as “A Lifetime Investment In Happiness.” But everything the company accomplished seemed on the verge of collapse in 1967. As hobbyists learned to their disappointment when they visited dealers, Lionel did not print a consumer catalog for 1967. Quite a letdown after 21 consecutive years of offering appealing catalogs in the postwar period. What happened in 1967? How did corporate executives deal with a declining market for toy trains? Let’s look in depth at the situation at Lionel in a disheartening yet consequential year, paying close attention to the trains released. Board of directors takes charge The name Lionel…

3 min
photo album

YOUR PICTURES CHUCK WINGATE’S S GAUGE LAYOUT Crews on Chuck Wingate’s 15 x 26-foot S gauge layout never get the opportunity to rest. He insists on keeping all the steamers perfectly serviced with their tenders filled with the coal needed for long trips. Anyone not hired to work on Chuck’s motive power probably has a job at one of the many freight-loading accessories he has installed on his model railroad in Westport, Mass. Readers can expect to learn much more about Chuck’s realistic S gauge display in an upcoming issue of Classic Toy Trains. ERIC BEHEIM’S O GAUGE DIORAMA The secrets behind the terrific pictures Eric Beheim takes of his vintage Marx trains in realistic settings will be unveiled later this year in our latest special-interest publication: All-Star Electric Trains: Celebrating 30 Years of…

1 min
additional lessons on building a quiet o gauge layout from jim steed

Rubber roadbed update Thank you for printing my article on rubber roadbed in the September Tips, Tools, & Techniques column. Here is a photo of my progress to date. No roads, trees, shrubs, people, cars, or scenery as yet, but, I am moving along. I temporarily screwed the track in place, used 20-gauge black insulated wire to “twist-tie” the track snugly to the roadbed and then removed all the screws. Presto, the layout now runs pretty quietly. I like the wire better than plastic zip-ties because I can quickly untie wire and make small adjustments. I placed thin rubber sheets underneath the nine postwar switches. I am well satisfied with the low level of train noise. Works great! Jim Steed Blairsville, Ga. HAVE A COMMENT Write “CTT Correspondence” on your letter and mail it to…

9 min
it runs in the family

The November 2017 issue of Classic Toy Trains marks the 30th anniversary of the toy train hobby’s premier magazine. To celebrate the occasion the November issue will spotlight the interaction between generations that has shaped the toy train hobby since its beginning. Virtually all of us involved with trains can thank an older person, typically a relative, for introducing us to them. To provide a taste of what will distinguish part – though not all – of the November issue, consider the experience of superb layout builder and dedicated Lionel collector Steve Garofalo. Steve’s introduction to toy trains in the 1950s resembles that of many CTT readers. So too does his pleasure these days of showing his grandchildren how much fun they can have with contemporary locomotives, rolling stock, and accessories. LIONEL…