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Cyclist December 2018

Dedicated solely to road cycling, Cyclist is the very first magazine of its kind. A celebration of the freedom to explore and the gear that makes road cycling special. Cyclist will take you on the world's best routes and get behind the doors of iconic brands. With performance advice from the experts, we unearth tall tales from the pro peloton and get you up-close to the best road bikes and technology. Plus, Cyclist mixes in-depth articles with breathtaking imagery from the sport's best photographers. It's the road cycling magazine you've been waiting for.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
Frequency:
Monthly
$9.24
$75.88
13 Issues

in this issue

1 min
ed's letter

I have never been very successful at collecting things. As a kid I once tried to start a shell collection, inspired by finding a number of attractive shells on a beach near my home in Scotland. However it didn’t take long before I realised that all the other shells on the beach would be pretty much identical to the ones I had already found, and that to extend my collection would require more exotic travel than I was able to facilitate as a 10-year-old. Then I started a stamp collection. That lasted about a week before I concluded that stamp collecting is really, really boring. Collecting trainers proved to be too expensive, as did collecting old Marvel comics. Eventually I was rescued from my attempts to establish a genuine collection by…

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3 min
slice and dice

It wasn’t that long ago when designers first had the idea to make road bikes more aerodynamic. Arguably it began in 2002 with the Cervélo Soloist, but since then developments have proceeded at such a pace that all the big brands are now competing to have the most wind-cheating bike. Tube shapes have become more aerofoil, components have become more integrated, and sticky-out things such as cables have been hidden away – all with the aim of making machines that slip through the air with barely a ripple. French brand Look took this approach to the extreme with its last aero road bike, the aggressive-looking 795 Aerolight, but its latest aero design has gone in the other direction. The new 795 Blade RS looks almost, well… normal. ‘We tried to take a…

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1 min
poc avip kit

Jersey £170, bibshorts £210, 2pure.co.uk Swedish brand Poc views its cycling gear very much as safety equipment, and AVIP is its acronym for Attention, Visibility, Interaction and Protection. For example, Poc use fabrics with ceramic additives to improve abrasion resistance, and for this latest kit the fabric is further reinforced with Vectran fibres – a super-strong polymer used by the military to make bulletproof vests. It means that if you hit the deck, AVIP gear should be far less likely to tear and expose your skin. While the look of the garments is the epitome of clean Scandinavian design, even the panel shapes have been chosen with safety in mind. According to Poc, the shapes and colours used in the AVIP collection are ones that best contrast with a typical riding environment, which…

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1 min
giant surge pro shoes

£275, giant-bicycles.com The big idea behind the Giant Surge shoe is the ExoBeam sole. Rather than having a carbon fibre plate right across the bottom of the shoe, the Surge has a narrow ‘beam’ of carbon that links the forefoot and heel. ‘When you’ve got a traditional plate last, what you are effectively doing is strapping the foot onto the footbed, which restricts the natural movement of the foot,’ says Giant’s Rob Lyne. ‘The ExoBeam maintains a stiff bed for power transfer but it allows the foot its natural torsional movement, which takes the pressure off the ankle and knee during the pedal rotation.’ The ExoBeam was present on the previous version of the Surge, launched three years ago. This latest update keeps the technology, but has refined the aesthetics. ‘One of the criticisms…

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1 min
pirelli cinturato velo tyres

£45.99 each, extrauk.co.uk Very few major tyre brands don’t have a tubeless option these days, and you can now strike Pirelli from that list. While its initial range of clincher tyres were true to the brand’s roots in racy performance, Pirelli has opted for a slightly different tack with its Cinturato tyre. It uses the brand’s ‘SmartNet Silica’ compound for low rolling resistance but combines that with more robust ‘Armour Tech’ nylon and aramid layers for extra protection and durability. Sizes are on trend, with the narrowest width available being 26mm, so the Cinturato looks to be just the ticket for long winter miles. As an aside, rumour has it that Continental – which as yet doesn’t have a tubeless option – has a big product launch coming up very soon… we wonder…

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1 min
assos mille gt jackets

Assos Mille GT Winter jacket (black) £215, Assos Mille GT Ultraz Winter Eisenherz jacket (red) £260, assos.com Assos’s Mille GT collection is best described as where everyday dependable kit meets race-tuned performance. The jackets are made to cope with a broad spectrum of conditions, but they use technical, high-stretch fabrics to keep the fit sleek, stylish and aero. The Mille GT and Mille GT Ultraz jackets are both new to the line-up, with the former designed for winter conditions and the latter for deep winter conditions. Both use Assos’s new in-house fabric Neos, which the company claims is highly breathable, water repellent and fully windproof, while still being soft and stretchy. Different weights of fabric are used in different places – heavier on the front panels for extra protection, and lighter on…

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