EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Hunting & Fishing
Fly FishermanFly Fisherman

Fly Fisherman February/March 2019

Fly Fisherman is the world's leading magazine for fly fishing. Every issue provides expert advice on the latest fly fishing techniques, the newest tackle and the hottest new fly patterns. Through informative articles, it highlights the best destinations for trout, salmon, steelhead, bass and saltwater species around the world!

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
SUBSCRIBE
$41.29
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
another victory for anglers

LET’S RAISE A glass to FLY FISHERMAN’s Conservationist of the Year, Joe Hemming. Hemming is the current president of Anglers of the Au Sable, a nonprofit conservation group with a 31-year history of conserving and protecting Michigan’s most well-known trout stream. Because of Hemming’s leadership and his pro bono legal work, in 2018 the organization was successful in making an out-of-court settlement with the owner of a local fish farm who had procured a lease and permits from the state to operate a commercial fish farm on the site of the Grayling Fish Hatchery—previously operated as a tourist attraction. In 2015, Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) approved the permit for Harrietta Hills Trout Farm to raise 300,000 pounds of trout annually in the hatchery raceways, with the hatchery effluent running…

access_time6 min.
tight lines

CARTER KUDOS I have been an avid reader of FLY FISHERMAN for almost 50 years, since moving from the warm bass and bream waters of South Georgia to the trout waters of the Chattahoochee River in Atlanta when I was governor. I contributed my first article to FLY FISHERMAN after fishing in Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania, while president, and later described a few of our annual overseas trips for rainbows and Atlantic salmon in Russia, taimen in Mongolia, sea-run browns in Patagonia, and bonefish and permit in Honduras. Reading your magazine has always been a pleasure and an inspiration, and your 50th Anniversary edition was no exception. PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER ATLANTA, GEORGIA FLATHEAD FLATTERY Hilary Hutcheson’s article on the Flathead in the June-July 2018 issue was both interesting and educational. I wasn’t aware that the…

access_time7 min.
on foot in oman

WE PUSHED OUR 12-foot aluminum boat 150 yards through the sand to access a pristine shoreline. We were hours by car from the nearest village, searching a pristine, remote, rocky shoreline for permit, bream, and queenfish. As we bombed casts into the rocks and structure, we saw a boat approaching on the horizon. It kept coming, straight toward us. We were in the middle of nowhere—miles from anyone and anything. The boat had to be coming toward us, as there was nothing else around. As the boat became recognizable we saw four men wearing traditional Muslim dress—and ski masks. Time to go! We tried to pull-start our outboard, but the engine wouldn’t fire up. I looked up, and saw the boat was nearly on top of us, there was no way to…

access_time11 min.
the only smith we have

THE SURNAME SMITH is known for being common. Ordinary. Smith is ubiquitous in England, Scotland, Germany, Canada, Australia, and Ireland, and is the name often adopted in the U.S. as an alias for people who don’t want to be found. In an ironic twist, west-central Montana’s Smith River is famous for being anything but ordinary, and is often adopted by those who don’t want to be found . . . at least for a week. It stands out as Montana’s sole permitted river. Escapees from reality pitch their names and a ten dollar application fee into a hat at the chance to converge on the 59-mile segment of the Smith that runs through a limestone canyon with only one public put-in and one public take-out. A lottery win (with single-digit odds) earns…

access_time11 min.
joe hemming

COMBINE THE FOLLOWING: a world-class trout stream in rural northern Michigan, a retired state fish hatchery, a politically connected fish farmer with the pomp and charm of a seasoned salesman, a state-sponsored aquaculture initiative, a thriving fly-fishing economy, a divorce lawyer working pro bono, the birthplace of Trout Unlimited, and you have a fair idea of the case that pitted the non-profit group Anglers of the Au Sable against a commercial fish farming operation on the headwaters of the Au Sable River. From Hatchery to Fish Farm The Grayling Fish Hatchery is an historic and dilapidated facility. It was once used to stock trout in the Au Sable River, which was done by floating buckets of fish down the river by canoe. Like any river, the Au Sable has its share of…

access_time18 min.
gear guide

Ross Evolution LTX $385-$395 THE ORIGINAL Evolution LT was famous for its ultra-smooth drag, and a sound as soothing as the voice of an old friend. Somehow the new Evolution LTX has a similar distinctive sound, but the stacked-disk system of the new reel is four times stronger on the top end, making it a far better tool for steelhead and salmon and a variety of saltwater species. I used the 7/8 for bonefish at Andros and Eleuthera islands, and later for fresh silver salmon near Iliamna, Alaska. The drag certainly has magnum stopping power, but more importantly the powerful top end also gives you increased range to make fine adjustments to handle multiple species. The bell-shaped arbor has a line channel to cleanly stow your arbor knot, and the LTX…

help