EXPLOREMY LIBRARYMAGAZINES
CATEGORIES
FEATURED
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Home & Garden
Good Organic Gardening

Good Organic Gardening

Issue #10.6 - 2020

Gardening with goodness at its heart — fresh, organic and fun. This magazine is 100% real. We are unashamedly earthy, reflecting the spirit and culture of people who just love to get their hands dirty. Our emphasis is on productive gardening. We just love the satisfaction of growing your own and finding new ways to bring produce to the table. The magazine includes features such as Amazing Gardens, Celebrity Chefs, Celebrity Gardeners, Clever Crops, Flavours of the month, Garden solutions, Kids Corner, Living Organics, Weekend Gardening, What’s New and a guide to What’s on Where. Purchase includes the Digital Edition and News Service. Please stay in touch via our Facebook Page.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Universal Wellbeing PTY Limited
Read More
SUBSCRIBE
$13.45
6 Issues

In this issue

2 min.
this issue

I’ve never kept geese — only chooks — but I have a friend who always owns a pair of Chinese geese. I put it that way because every once in a while, sadly, something happens to one and she has to replace her or him. But she would never be without them, and I can understand why. When I go to her house for coffee we often sit on the deck and watch the geese pottering around the beautiful gardens and magnificent dam her house overhangs. My friend has a very productive orchard where the geese clean up the fallen fruit and generally keep things tidier than they might otherwise be. Despite the danger of roaming foxes and large eels in the dam, these geese have quite the life, but they…

1 min.
good organic gardening

Editor Kerry Boyne Designer Kate Atkinson Contributors Carrol Baker, Claire Bickle, Angelo Eliades, Jana Holmer, Jo Immig, Melissa King, Steve McGrane, Megg Miller, Jennifer Stackhouse, Chris Stafford, Chloe Thomson National Advertising Manager Miriam Keen Ph: (02) 9887 0604 | Fax: (02) 9878 5553 Mb: 0414 969 693 Email: mkeen@umco.com.au Advertising Art Director Martha Rubazewicz Advertising Production Co-ordinator Alex Dalland Cover Photo Getty Images Chairman/CEO Prema Perera Publisher Janice Williams Chief Financial Officer Vicky Mahadeva Associate Publisher Emma Perera Finance & Administration Manager James Perera Circulation Business Development Manager Mark McTaggart Creative Director Kate Podger Marketing & Acquisitions Manager Chelsea Peters…

1 min.
dawn piper

One of the larger Australian robins, the eastern yellow is a sociable bird, inquisitive and bold with little or no fear of humans. This makes it easily observable throughout its habitat, the forests and woodlands of the east coast from North Queensland to Victoria and inland to the western slopes of the Great Dividing Range, as well as in urban parks and gardens. While the Bundjalung people of northern New South Wales know it as julim julim, its genus name Eopsaltria means “dawn singer” and its piercing, piping song is one of the day’s first bird calls, often well before sunrise. A perch-and-pounce hunter of insects, the eastern yellow robin has the quirky habit of sitting sideways on a tree trunk. In fact, it tends to be sedentary, rarely moving…

4 min.
the grapevine

JO IMMIG Jo is an environmental scientist, photographer and writer. She has worked in the environment movement for decades and is co-ordinator of the National Toxics Network, an organisation dedicated to creating a toxic-free future. She has written many articles for magazines and is the author of two books: Toxic Playground and Safer Solutions. WHERE HAVE ALL THE FISH GONE? Global population increases and growing wealth are driving up demand for seafood. Yet, despite the growth in aquaculture and global efforts to make commercial fishing more sustainable, fish are disappearing from the oceans at an alarming rate. According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, one-third of commercial fish stocks are still harvested at biologically unsustainable levels and 90 per cent of fisheries are exploited to capacity. The population of Pacific bluefin tuna, for…

3 min.
what’s hot right now

CHLOE THOMSON A horticulturist, writer and passionate organic gardener, Chloe is co-owner and presenter of the web-based series The Gardenettes and has been a regular presenter on The Garden Gurus. The mother of two little boys, she has a great following of Australian gardeners on her social media profile Bean There Dug That. FIG‘ST DOMINIQUE VIOLETTE’, FICUS CARICA The plant: Step back in time and try this heritage violet-skinned French fig. It’s said to have been grown at the Burnley Horticultural College in Melbourne back in 1875 and you can spot it in old mail-order catalogues up until the 1930s. It’s available again thanks to Phil Shephard, whose family has been growing fruit trees in Victoria for three generations. This self-pollinating fig is one for the collector and connoisseur. Growing: As with all figs,…

3 min.
super tuber

Used to make bland biscuits and invalid food and as a substitute for potato, arrowroot is a plant with a long history in Australia. Gluten free, rich in carbs and best known here as Queensland arrowroot, it was the original source of flour for arrowroot biscuits. Today, arrowroot flour is made from another tropical tuber called West Indian arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea). It may have Queensland in its name but the plant can be grown in all parts of Australia, though it comes into its own in warmer climes. In cooler areas it needs a warm, sheltered spot. It originated in tropical parts of America. Permaculture expert Frances Michaels, of mail-order supplier Green Harvest in Queensland, says it was first processed commercially at Mount Tambourine and originally grown as a subsistence food in…