EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Men's Lifestyle
GQ

GQ September 2020

GQ is the authority on men and is the premier men's magazine. With its unique and powerful design, the best photographers, and a well of award-winning writers, GQ reaches millions each month. Get GQ digital magazine subscription today for the best in men's fashion and style, beautiful women and culture, news and politics.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
Frequency:
Monthly
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10 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
contributor

GERRICK D. KENNEDY Writer Kennedy is glad his interview with Travis Scott for GQ’s September cover story was in person, at a studio in L.A. “I think Travis would have been impossible to figure out over the phone,” Kennedy says. “He speaks with his whole body; he’s an incandescent presence.” Office Grails…

3 min.
what we mean when we say “change is good”

SO FAR I HAVE spent much of 2020 editing this magazine from a bedroom turned office, often accompanied by one of our two cats. Her name is Nou Nou, and she has perfect presence. She’s not stuck in the past or worried about the future—she’s just right here. She really holds me down, energetically speaking. No matter what level of drama is booming through my Zoom, she is unperturbed. She likes to sleep on a pair of my pants, or on a T-shirt. When she’s awake, she looks at me and blinks slowly. Occasionally she sits silently at the door until I notice her there and let her out. In his essential 2018 book, Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now, Jaron Lanier writes about how cats are…

1 min.
change is good

Masculinity is a work in progress—and change is the way ahead. GQ has been changing since 1957. For 50 million global readers, GQ is a trusted friend, encouraging changes in the way we live, face the day, and influence the world around us. With a renewed emphasis on diversity, gender equality, sustainability, and mental health, GQ will continue to push forward. Because change is good.…

6 min.
what goes best with a suit? just about anything

THE SUIT AS “SOFT SEPARATES” A sure way to ward off tailoring fatigue is to invest in bold suit separates—a soft paisley blazer and cinched houndstooth trousers are a great place to start—and clash them together. NOT PICTURED: COWBOY BOOTS Next time you’re suit shopping, consider a perfectly classic silhouette (like this three-piece) in an unusual, stunt-tastic fabric (like brown-butter suede). SHORT PANTS AND A LOOOONG JACKET Enter the matrix of advanced tailoring fits by ditching a standard blazer for a flowy topcoat in wool suiting fabric. IT’S NOT A SUIT, IT’S A FRANKENSUIT Patchwork-fabric suits—an invention of necessity—have been around as long as men have dressed up. Now they’re the freshest way to rock a retro three-button silhouette.…

1 min.
legends of the freaky suit

1. ANDRÉ 3000 New York City, 2009 The OutKast icon yanks the corduroy suit off the professor’s armchair by owning the rumpledness, turning up the sleeves, and jamming in a wilted pocket square. 2. WARREN BEATTY AND DIANE KEATON New York City, 1978 Here you get two extremes of the wild-suiting spectrum. See-through shirting or lipstick-red standing collar with a ribbon tie? Silk-wool fabric or wide wales? One belt or two? Go Beatty-esque for the nightclub, Keaton-ish for the country club, or mix their codes for a little bespoke mélange. 3. ROBIN WILLIAMS Los Angeles, 1999 This is what they dreamed would eventually happen when making the switch from gas lighting to electric on Savile Row all those decades ago: Robin Williams in screaming white pinstripes with a knit tie in bonkers blue. 4. DENNIS RODMAN New York City, 1996 Basketball’s…

4 min.
the phrase “people of color” needs to die

MY HATE FOR THE nebulous, jittery, and useless term “people of color” can at least partially be blamed on celery sticks, cherry tomatoes, and ranch dressing. It was 2017 (I think). I was on a panel about anti-Blackness, but I don’t remember exactly where. (Pittsburgh, maybe?) I do remember that the organizers said that there’d be food there. (And I know they said this, because I asked. And I know I asked, because I always ask.) Unfortunately, my definition of “appropriate food for an evening panel with adults” (pizza, pasta, a chicken finger, etc.) did not match theirs, and so I sat onstage, annoyed and hungry. My stomach growled so loud it could have been mistaken for microphone feedback. So, near the end of the panel, when an audience member asked…