EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Home & Garden
HOME Magazine NZ

HOME Magazine NZ

April 2020

HOME covers the best New Zealand architecture, design and interiors. It features inspirational, ingenious and just plain breathtaking homes from all over the country – as well as new restaurants, exciting art and the latest furniture releases.

Country:
New Zealand
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bauer Media Pty Ltd
Frequency:
Interrupted
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6 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
it’s a cracker!

We bought a house! It seemed to take forever and we went to rather a lot of open homes. I spent many hours investigating the Auckland Unitary Plan and sketching on the back of real-estate brochures, because if I don’t do that I can’t commit to a house. We made offers and we stood in auctions and always, just always, we seemed to be $50,000, $100,000, $150,000 behind. We would practice our doomsday scenario before we went: what’s the most this could go for? And then it would go for more. Much more – in one case, up in lots of $1000 for 30 painful minutes as two couples with young children desperately battled it out over a two-bedroom house with an illegal deck. Finally, one Sunday, we went to see an…

3 min.
contributors

Jackie Meiring The photographer travelled to Waiheke to capture a loose encampment by Cheshire Architects for a couple who challenged orthodox luxuries, as well as the architects, in creating their unique home (p. 94). The materials chosen by Cheshire Architects for the ‘Awaawaroa’ house seem simultaneously elegant and rugged. What elements stand out when seeing the house in person? On first sight, the dwellings are both visually intriguing and beautiful. The canvas skin on the sleeping pods seems alive as it catches the light, a lovely juxtaposition to the crisp timber cathedral-like living structure. Their uniqueness comes from both the unusual material use and the way they relate to each other, and the landscape in which they lie. They also engage the viewer in storytelling... they evoke a feeling and narrative that’s…

4 min.
new kid

LO’CA gives a couple space to entertain in a 4.5-metre 1870s cottage in Thorndon, Wellington. FIONA BARR, OWNER Our house is one in a row of three identical cottages; it’s in a great location but was small for our needs. We wanted a modern renovation that would respect the history of the building. The existing kitchen-dining area could only seat four and we love food and entertaining, so wanted an area to have our friends over for meals. We also needed storage and hoped we could include some built-in seating and a WC. LO’CA [Lovell O’Connell Architects] were recommended to us by a local architect and we shared their fondness for mid-century architecture. They provided us with two exciting options, which highlighted the need for an architect even for a small square box. ANA…

1 min.
by hand

Artisan glass blowers Monmouth have made a name in recent years for light fixtures that combine art and craft into designs that feel hand made but still refined. Meanwhile, Petley is owned by Courtney Petley, who hand-turns everyday objects from reclaimed native New Zealand timber. Together, they have made the ‘Balanced’ lamp, a beautiful limited-edition design. It features a cylindrical base made from totara sourced from a demolished railway shed in Morrinsville, turned and honed, then finished with tung oil and beeswax. The light is a frosted globe, hand-blown by Monmouth’s Stephen Bradbourne and Isaac Katzoff in their studio in Henderson, Auckland. The globe sits lightly on top of the cylinder, offset to one side – as if it had just been placed there casually. The result is elegant and contemporary, a…

2 min.
testing time

4 min.
jason whiteley

Tell us about your background. I grew up in the western suburbs of Christchurch. When I was two my parents designed and built a four-bedroom house and have lived there ever since. My father ran a manufacturing company that originally did heavy contract engineering, then switched to exporting marine propulsion systems. The company had a big industrial site near the Addington Raceway, a triangle of land bisected by the railway line that runs from the wharves of Lyttleton out West to Rolleston and then South to Timaru. My brother and I would play there on Saturdays while my father worked. There was a big shed with a steam train in it and glider parts lying around – it was that kind of place. I didn’t realise it at the time, but…