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Landscape Photography Workshops Landscape Photography Workshops

Landscape Photography Workshops

Landscape Photography Workshops

For countless enthusiast photographers the world over, nothing offers as much inspiration as heading out into the great outdoors, regardless of the time of year or weather conditions, to capture beautiful landscapes. As a photographer, little comes close to matching the feeling of returning home in the knowledge that you have memory cards filled with a selection of stunning scenes, all beautifully captured. Landscape Photography Workshops is an invaluable guide packed with essential technique advice, expert guides, photo workshops and stunning photography that aims to give you all the information, advice and inspiration you need to improve your landscape photography skills. It features tutorials from many of the UK’s favourite outdoor photographers, with emphasis on key in-camera techniques. To ensure you head out with the best possible choice of photo gear, a landscape kit section is filled with authoritative reviews of essential accessories, including ND graduated filters, tripods and gadget bags. Be sure to read this indispensable guide and learn from the UK’s leading experts how to take your best-ever landscape images.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
welcome...

“For countless enthusiast photographers the world over, nothing offers as much inspiration as heading out into the great outdoors, regardless of the time of year or weather conditions, to capture beautiful landscapes. as a photographer, little comes close to matching the feeling of returning home in the knowledge that you have memory cards filled with a selection of stunning scenes, all beautifully captured. Landscape Photography Workshops is an invaluable guide packed with essential technique advice, expert guides, photo workshops and stunning photography that aims to give you all the information, advice and inspiration you need to improve your landscape photography skills. it features tutorials from many of the uk’s favourite outdoor photographers, with emphasis on key in-camera techniques. to ensure you head out with the best possible choice of photo…

access_time3 min.
understanding landscapes

TO CAPTURE A truly great landscape image, you need to take the viewer on a journey – leading their eye around the frame and retain their gaze by implying depth or motion. Obviously composition is a key component, which is why we’ve dedicated the last dozen pages to it; however, a good understanding of your camera gear, exposure and filters is every bit as important. In order to successfully convey the beauty of a location – not to mention your vision and creativity – you need to make educated choices. What focal length suits the scene best? Is a fast or slow exposure needed? Do you require front-to-back sharpness, or would a shallower zone of focus create a more artistic, interesting result? Would filters enhance the scene? These are questions…

access_time4 min.
achieving a good exposure

Digital cameras are so intelligent today that you can simply select one of your camera’s automatic exposure modes, and start shooting. However, doing so would severely limit your creative options. many consumer cameras boast a number of Picture or scene modes, tailored to optimise settings for a particular subject. there is normally a landscape mode, which will bias settings to suit this subject; however, they offer photographers very limited control – instead, you are far better off switching to aperture-priority mode. While some photographers favour working in manual mode, aperture-priority is perfectly suited to landscapes. it is a semi-automatic mode, where you select the f/stop required, and the camera does the rest for you – setting the 'correct', corresponding shutter speed. this mode gives you complete control over depth-of-field – allowing…

access_time4 min.
understanding apertures

Just as the pupil of the eye widens and contracts to control the amount of light reaching the retina, the size of the aperture can be made bigger or smaller to determine the amount of light allowed to pass through the lens and strike the sensor. select a wide aperture and light can pass through quicker. select a small aperture and it will take longer for sufficient imageforming light to expose the sensor, but you achieve a greater depth-of-field as a result. aperture has a reciprocal relationship with shutter speed (page 12). Aperture size is represented by numbers, or f/stops. typically, the scale ranges from f/2.8 to f/22, although this varies depending on the lens. Confusingly, larger apertures are represented by lower numbers, for example f/2.8 or f/4. While larger numbers…

access_time4 min.
master shutter speeds

Shutter speed is the second most important factor to control exposure and it has a reciprocal relationship with aperture. it refers to the time the camera’s shutter remains open during exposure. this can be very brief, as fast as 1/8000sec on some digital sLrs; but it can also be very slow, up to 30 seconds or as long as your battery will last while using the Bulb mode – several minutes or even hours is possible. The exact length of exposures depend on the available light, the aperture and isO rating selected. in aperture-priority mode, the camera automatically selects the shutter speed, choosing a length it believes will go with your choice of aperture to create a perfectly-exposed result. in manual mode, you need to dial in the shutter speed yourself. For…

access_time3 min.
let’s focus on landscapes

Wide-angle lenses possess an inherently large depth-of-field. Therefore, you might assume using one together with a small aperture is all you need to do to capture landscapes that are sharp throughout. You can’t be lazy with focusing, though; if you focus poorly, you will waste depth-of-field unnecessarily. A lens can only focus precisely on one plane, so sharpness naturally and gradually decreases either side of this. depth-of-field is the acceptable level of focus extending either side of the point of focus. it extends approximately one-third in front of this point and two-thirds beyond it. Therefore, if you simply focus on, or close to, infinity, you will waste the depth-of-field falling beyond your focal point. equally, if you focus too near into the scene, you won’t get the full benefit of the…

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