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category_outlined / Men's Lifestyle
Men's JournalMen's Journal

Men's Journal April 2019

Geared toward the modern, adventurous man, Men's Journal magazine is for guys who enjoy their leisure time and want to get the most out of it. From health and fitness to sports and travel, each month Men's Journal has it covered.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Media Operations, Inc
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
letter from the editor

I COULDN’T STOP staring out the window. The snow was absolutely mesmerizing, falling like confetti, and covering the already white evergreens along Highway 26 atop Oregon’s Mount Hood. My friend Davide was gripping the steering wheel tightly, trying to keep our Jeep Wrangler from skidding across the road. He had the hard job; all I had to do was make sure the tunes were decent and stare out that window. The stretch of road was beautiful—among the tall Douglas firs, there were meandering trails that stretched deep into the snowy woods. We sped past one of those telltale brown signs that told us we were entering Mount Hood National Forest. My mind wandered to all the adventures to be had in these woods: snowshoeing, winter camping, nordic skiing, and ice…

access_time2 min.
field notes

Feedback I was pumped to read Devon O’Neil’s story “Giving Up the Gas” (February 2019), about low-emissions ski legend Greg Hill. This is our life—we drive a Volt, love backcountry powder, travel everywhere, and do our best to protect the Earth. I appreciate O’Neil digging in, asking tough questions, and spotlighting Hill. Well done. ELIZABETH PALCHAK-CONNELLY CHARLOTTE, VT DUTY CALLS In Clint Carter’s otherwise excellent story “Surviving Behind Enemy Lines” (February 2019), he neglected to cover a serious survival concern: dysentery. Over my long military career, I saw time and again how quickly the shits can cripple an airman. It’s not exciting to talk about, but waterborne-disease prevention is as important as mosquito swatting. Z.L.G. STEIN CHICAGO MISS LIST Here’s a list of things I don’t understand, or care for, in the February issue: 1) A GearLab…

access_time1 min.
dash across the desert

IN JANUARY, HUNDREDS of competitors traveled to Peru for the Dakar Rally, widely considered one of the toughest motorsport events in the world, given its length and treacherous off-road terrain. Since the race, which changes location each year, began in 1979, 19 motorcyclists have died; as a result, riders must now write their blood types on their helmets, in the event of a bad spill. This year, about 70 percent of the 3,100-mile rally took place on sand dunes, such as these about 40 miles outside the city of Pisco. “Each kilometer in the sand pretty much equals three kilometers on hardpack,” says Toby Price, 31, an Australian rider for Red Bull KTM (seen here at the far left). “It’s hard to control the motorcycle, and you never know what’s…

access_time6 min.
bolivia’s new food revolution

EVERY COUNTRY has its street food—banh mi in Vietnam, pierogi in Poland, arepas in Colombia. In Bolivia, it’s anticuchos, sizzling kebabs of heavily spiced, sliced beef heart. More than once I’ve chewed my way through a few of these in the capital, La Paz, after a night out. Which is why, last fall, while dining at the city’s fanciest restaurant, Gustu, it came as a shock when a server brought me a stick of meat on a cooking stone. Here, anticuchos were elevated to haute cuisine. Gustu lies in tony Zona Sur, an affluent neighborhood of La Paz. That night, in addition to grilling my own anticuchos, I used a bone to eat honey-cured lamb, plucked an ant off the top of a pickled harlequin beet, and licked a crunchy Andean…

access_time1 min.
four can’t-miss meals in la paz

GUSTU It’s the place that started it all, and you dine on à la carte plates like caiman tail with watermelon rind or hunker down for eight-to 22-course tasting menus. ALI PACHA Ali Pacha is a serene oasis of plant-based fine dining amid the chaos of downtown. It offers three- to seven-course vegan meals that even carnivores will drool over. POPULAR COCINA BOLIVIANA You won’t find a cheaper gourmet lunch anywhere in the Americas, with modern twists on staples like pastel de papas (potato pie) and patasca (a grain-based stew). JALLALLA The vibe is always electric at this eclectic, art-infused folk-music venue. Not a single ingredient used in the tapas or one-of-a-kind cocktails comes from outside Bolivia.…

access_time5 min.
the right time to buy online

CLAD IN A white lab coat and sitting at a large wood workbench in the corner of a workshop with views of the woods out back, Charles Emslie grabs a magnifying loupe and casts his gaze on a 1989 Rolex Submariner 16610. The stainless steel watch with a black bezel probably sold for around $1,500 when it was released, but today it is prized by collectors and can fetch as much as $8,000—if it’s in mint condition. Unfortunately, that’s not the case with this Rolex. “The watch is old enough that the oils have degraded and gotten dirty and dried out,” Emslie says. “It needs a complete overhaul.” With that, Emslie, 32, who’s been repairing fine watches for a decade, prepares to go inside the Submariner and take it apart piece by…

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