EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
Motorcycle Classics

Motorcycle Classics May - June 2020

Motorcycle Classics is the authoritative voice of America’s growing classic motorcycle community and the premier magazine for collectors and enthusiasts. Following the latest news and trends, and featuring in-depth reviews and riding impressions – with full technical profiles and value assessments – of classic motorcycles from every continent, Motorcycle Classics brings yesterday’s bikes into focus for today’s classic motorcycle aficionados.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ogden Publications, Inc.
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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$36.20
6 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
visit road america

One of our favorite trips every year is our trek to Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, home of the Road America race track. This year we'll make our trip in May to be a part of Vintage MotoFest, May 30, 2020, in conjunction with the MotoAmerica Superbikes Series (roadamerica.com). We began attending the summer vintage motorcycle races way back in 2010, the first year AHRMA racing returned there. For the first few years we ran our own bike show, but since 2014 we've joined forces with the fine staff from Road America to judge the Saturday ride-in bike show, and to give away our own Motorcycle Classics Editor's Choice award. This year's Vintage MotoFest event pairs with a busy weekend at the track, as the MotoAmerica Superbike Series comes to Road America, May 29-31,…

1 min.
yamaha r5 correction

I just picked up your March/April issue and found the Yamaha R5 article of interest because I owned two of them. Of note though, Mr. Gingerelli got one thing wrong. He stated the engine cases on the R3 split vertically. I picked up a complete 1969 R3 350 project last year and I assure you that the cases are split horizontally. Otherwise, great magazine as usual and I always look forward to the latest issue. Thanks. Jeff Carruthers/Calgary, Alberta, Canada Reply from author Dain Gingerelli: “Jeff, nice catch. Sometimes I just can’t seem to distinguish up from down, and the day that I wrote the R5 article must have been one of those days! I stand corrected — Yamaha’s first 350cc twin, the YR series (1967-1969), checked in with horizontally split cases. In…

2 min.
“unlike gnomes, dwarfs are miners and can often re-open a clogged passage.”

Identifying an old bike I have rediscovered a music video with a very cool-looking vintage motorcycle and I am curious if anyone at Motorcycle Classics might be able to identify the bike. The video is Once in a Blue Moon by Earl Thomas Conley. It might also be a fun question to put out there for the readers to try to answer. I subscribe to your magazine and love it! Lowell Miller/Fort Worth, Texas Lowell, It’s a BSA, but we’re still trying to identify what specific model. Tech Editor Keith Fellenstein looked through some old BSA manuals. Note the square barrel and the conical front brake. It could be a Starfire 250, Shooting Star 441 or a Victor Roadster, but we’re having a hard time being sure. Readers, can you help us verify which…

2 min.
basics of carburetor operation

The basic secret of carburetor function is that inside each carburetor are thousands of tiny gnomes, each with a small bucket. As you open the throttle more of these gnomes are allowed out of their house and into the float bowl, where they fill the buckets and climb up the carburetor’s passages to the intake, where they empty their buckets into the air stream. But, if you don’t ride the bike for a while, bad things can happen. Tiny bats take up residence in the chambers of the carburetor, and before long the passages are plugged up with guano. This creates a gnome traffic jam, and so not enough bucketfuls of fuel can get to the engine. If it gets bad enough, the gnomes simply give up and go take a…

1 min.
on the market

We were happily surprised to find a current listing for a VF500F, as they’re fairly thin on the ground these days. Found on eBay and located on Bainbridge Island, Washington, this VF500F shows roughly 33,900 miles. The current owner has had it for 16 years, and it looks to be a well-loved rider, not perfect, but awfully close. The original paint is holding up well, but the finish of the black-chrome mufflers shows some wear and the seat cover has a tear on the right side. The seller notes that the fuel pump has been removed, and that you currently can’t use the entire capacity of the tank due to this. So do your research on finding a fuel pump if this is the bike for you!…

3 min.
vee for victory: honda vf500f

To enter a new capacity class, is it better to scale up a smaller bike, downsize a bigger one, or start from scratch? Many bike makers over the years have “stretched” a smaller capacity engine to create a larger one. While that may offer the best return on investment, is it a sound idea? In creating the engine for the VF500F of 1984, Honda went with scaling up. The new 500 was based on the Japanese/European market VF400F, but used cylinder dimensions and cylinder head design from the V-twin VT250. The result was effectively two side-by-side 90-degree 250s on a common crankcase, but with a strengthened bottom end. More on that later … Inside the VF500F, duplex chains drove four overhead camshafts acting on 16 valves via finger-type followers with threaded adjusters.…