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Women's Lifestyle
O, The Oprah Magazine

O, The Oprah Magazine June 2020

Get O, The Oprah Magazine digital subscription today and experience 360 degrees of a woman’s life, from fashion and beauty, to relationships, food, home design, books, health and fitness, work and finance, technology, self-discovery and caring for others.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst
Frequency:
One-off

in this issue

1 min.
joy ride

The Big Picture Before Oprah went on her nationwide 2020 Vision: Your Life in Focus tour—and before Covid-19 shook up the world—the O crew ventured to Santa Barbara to shoot this cover and a few others. Life is all about finding your balance!—OPRAH COMFORT ZONE You can rely on cozy clothes to make you feel good, whether you’re out for a walk or inside working. But you’ll be pulled together by combining the snuggle of soft fabrics with the structure of a white shirt and finishing the look with spiffy sneakers.…

2 min.
brave acts

Martha Beck LIFE COACH “CREATURE COMFORT,” PAGE 78 If I had no fear, I’d…do exactly what I usually do. I decided years ago to do something that scares me every single day. Now fear is just a nervous passenger in my life, not the driver. I’ll always worry about…the fact that I worry. Experience has taught me that worry just doesn’t work—and it feels awful. Something that never fails to calm my mind is…tuning in to stillness. It’s always there under the surface, even in chaotic situations. Ben Watts PHOTOGRAPHER “YOUR BODY BEAUTIFUL,” PAGE 94 The scariest thing I’ve ever done is…climb Sydney Harbour Bridge at 2 a.m., when it wasn’t open to the public. I was a teenager, and I didn’t want to, but a girl I was with was up for the challenge, so I…

2 min.
q who is the bravest person you know?

My son, who works for the U.S. Postal Service. People think it’s an easy job, but it takes a lot of energy and strong nerves. GLORIA WILLIAMS East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania My father. I grew up in Sri Lanka with two older brothers. To fund my college education, he took a risky job in Afghanistan at the peak of the Taliban war. In 2007, he survived a bomb attack there. I was the first one to receive a phone call—he wanted me to know he was okay. As I sobbed on the phone, he comforted me. He believed his only girl deserved the best education and did not want me to take the blame. GEETHIKA FERNANDO Southington, Connecticut My 92-year-old mother, Nary Lee, as she confronts her fear of aging. She steers her…

1 min.
your take

Q IF YOU COULD HAVE ONLY ONE DIP FOR YOUR CHIPS, WHICH WOULD YOU CHOOSE? 33% I’M A SALSA PRO 67% HOLY GUACAMOLE! STORY, PAGE 104 Q DO YOU SPEND MORE TIME THINKING ABOUT THE PAST OR THE FUTURE? 24% I CAN’T GET PAST THE YOU-KNOW-WHAT 76 % I’M ALL ABOUT WHAT’S COMING STORY, PAGE 53 Q HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT SWIMSUIT SHOPPING? 64% I GUESS IT’S BETTER THAN A ROOT CANAL? 36% IT’S EASY BREEZY! STORY, PAGE 31 Q WOULD YOU RATHER READ FICTION OR NONFICTION? 44% NONFICTION—AND THAT’S A FACT! 56% FICTION—WHAT A NOVEL IDEA! STORY, PAGE 68 Q WINE: RED OR WHITE? 50% I’M WED TO RED 50% WHITE IS MORE THAN ALL RIGHT STORY, PAGE 65 WE WANT YOUR TAKE! TO WEIGH IN ON FUTURE TOPICS, FOLLOW US @oprahmagazine…

2 min.
here we go!

IT’S ACTUALLY EARLY April as I write my June letter to you. We’ve seen valor, ingenuity, compassion, and, above all, love during this pandemic. I’ve been buoyed by the heroism and dedication of so many and saddened by the selfishness of a few. Still, our goal this month is what it’s always been: to help you live your best life—even when that life has been dramatically altered. Some thoughts on how to keep calm and rise to every challenge begin on page 76. You know, we talk a lot these days about staying in the moment, but sometimes the most effective way to be happy in the present is to project yourself into the future. Check out an uplifting brand of therapy that suggests we gain as much by thinking ahead…

2 min.
elizabeth gilbert

To celebrate 20 years of O, each month we’re spotlighting a remarkable person who is changing the way we look at our world. ELIZABETH GILBERT’S Eat, Pray, Love, a chronicle of her postdivorce adventures in Italy, India, and Bali, became an iconic travel memoir not for its incredible scenes, transcendent experiences, and fascinating characters—although it has all of those things—but because the story began in a place where many of her readers have found themselves: kneeling on the bathroom floor in crisis. Gilbert’s account of making peace with the past and discovering her more authentic self gave women an example of another kind of hero’s journey, one in which the treasure at the end of the quest is a more truthful life. Eat, Pray, Love fans have told Gilbert that the…