EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
News & Politics
Reader's Digest Canada

Reader's Digest Canada

November 2020

Canada's most read, most trusted magazine.<br><br> Inspiring real-life stories, laugh-out-loud humour, and insightful articles about health, lifestyles, and truly remarkable Canadians, Reader's Digest touches your life and connects you to the world around you -- now that's "life well shared".

Country:
Canada
Language:
English
Publisher:
Readers Digest Canada
Frequency:
Monthly
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$20.43
12 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
just for laughs

A sense of humour is serious business in this country. Before the pandemic cancelled fun, it was hard to find a town untouched by the bug of comedy tours, stand-up and improv clubs, and that local har-deehar guy everyone hires to emcee their wedding. The Canadian Association of Stand-up Comedians estimates that seven national tours and 26 comedy festivals were postponed this summer—or scrapped altogether. This especially hurts because comedy is so intertwined with Canada’s identity. Ask someone anywhere in the world to name a famous Canadian, and their answers will be skewed to the Jim Carreys, Martin Shorts, Samantha Bees, Wayne and Shusters, Dan Aykroyds and Lilly Singhs. They’re our star system, our truth-tellers and our collective release valve. Living in a country with such long winters would be a…

1 min.
contributors

ALICIA WYNTER Photographer, Waterloo, Ont. “Breast Friend” Wynter often shoots portrait photography, and she loves the chance to learn about her subjects’ lives. Her work has been published in the Waterloo Region Record, the Toronto Sun, the Toronto Star and Chatelaine. Her photography has been nominated for a Black Canada Award, and in 2019 she was a finalist for Shoot The Face, a monthly photo contest. Check out her work on page 13. PAIGE STAMPATORI Illustrator, Cambridge, Ont. “Body, Heal Thyself” Stampatori finds illustrating for magazines and newspapers provides her with uniquely exciting opportunities to stay on top of current events and to collaborate with fellow creative types. Stampatori’s illustrations have appeared in the Washington Post, Wine Enthusiast and the Georgia Straight, among other publications. See her latest work on page 22. WENDY LITNER Writer, Toronto “Cooking Through Grief” Writing is…

2 min.
letters

POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT My wife was always happy when she found a copy of Reader’s Digest Canada at her doctor’s office, so we subscribed. As a whole, I think the magazine does a great job of keeping content light and sensitive to readers. I encourage you to make sure that you celebrate Canadian success stories even more—there are lots of those. In light of what the world has been through in 2020, good news is what folks need today. —DOUG BROAD, Toronto SAFETY FIRST I enjoyed reading “P.M. Dad” (June 2020) by Justin Trudeau. I was alarmed, however, by the accompanying photograph of the prime minister throwing Xavier, his then-two-year-old son, up in the air. I cringe to think of the potential danger had he not caught him! — NELLIE P. STROWBRIDGE, Pasadena, NL EYESORE About 10 years…

3 min.
breast friend

EARLIER THIS YEAR, Chetna Bhatt, a 55-year-old informa tion manager in London, Ont., received a diagnosis of triple-negative breast cancer—a rare form of the disease that doesn’t respond to typical treatment. She had plenty of questions and even more fears. When she visited her family doctor, she found him to be less than helpful, even dismissive. An acquaintance suggested she contact Annette Richard, a local GP with a national reputation for helping women with breast cancer prepare for one of the most trying ordeals of their lives. Richard, who is 59 years old, traces her start as a breast-cancer guru to the moment she learned, while training in palliative care, that a typical mastectomy is a day procedure. The thought chilled her—similarly invasive surgeries, including for prostate cancer, require significantly longer…

3 min.
how do masks protect me?

Most Canadians agree masks help to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but can you review how that works? Scientific evidence has shown that if 80 per cent of the population wears a reusable cloth mask, the spread of COVID-19 in the community decreases by 40 per cent. That kind of decrease is enough to make it so the number of cases isn’t growing exponentially. That’s extremely significant. It’s why we need a high level of public buy-in. Because my mask protects you and your mask protects me? Exactly. In the early stages of COVID, we were still looking at masks in terms of their potential to protect the wearer. But now we know that the chief purpose of wearing a cloth mask is not to keep the coronavirus out, but to keep your…

3 min.
the truth about house fires

1 Four in 10 fatal house fires occur between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., when most residents are asleep. “Make sure you have working smoke alarms on every storey and outside every sleeping area,” says Ryan Betts, spokesperson for the Office of the Fire Marshal of Ontario. 2 Test smoke alarms monthly. “Vacuum around the alarm to clear any dust that could block the smoke sensor,” says Betts. Replace the battery twice a year and replace the alarm itself by its expiry date. 3 Closing your bedroom door while you sleep may help firefighters save your life. “A bedroom with a closed door will heat up to 37 C, versus 500 C outside the door,” says Cynthia Ross Tustin, president of the Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs. 4 Carbon-monoxide gas, which you can’t…