EXPLOREMY LIBRARYMAGAZINES
CATEGORIES
  • Art & Architecture
  • Boating & Aviation
  • Business & Finance
  • Cars & Motorcycles
  • Celebrity & Gossip
  • Comics & Manga
  • Crafts
  • Culture & Literature
  • Family & Parenting
  • Fashion
  • Food & Wine
  • Health & Fitness
  • Home & Garden
  • Hunting & Fishing
  • Kids & Teens
  • Luxury
  • Men's Lifestyle
  • Movies, TV & Music
  • News & Politics
  • Photography
  • Science
  • Sports
  • Tech & Gaming
  • Travel & Outdoor
  • Women's Lifestyle
  • Adult
FEATURED
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Hunting & Fishing
Shooting Times

Shooting Times

March 2020

Every issue of Shooting Times brings you exciting, authoritative coverage of guns, ammunition, reloading, and the shooting sports. Written for the experienced and novice gun enthusiast by focusing on new product developments and activities in the shooting industry.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
Read More
SUBSCRIBE
$23.98
12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
shooting times

PUBLISHER Mike Schoby EDITORIAL EDITOR IN CHIEF Joel J. Hutchcroft COPY EDITOR Michael Brecklin CONTRIBUTORS Jake Edmondson Steve Gash Allan Jones Lane Pearce Layne Simpson Bart Skelton Joseph von Benedikt Terry Wieland ART ART DIRECTOR Stephan D. Ledeboer SENIOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tim Neher STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Michael Anschuetz PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER Terry Boyer PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jenny Kaeb ENDEMIC AD SALES NATIONAL ENDEMIC SALES Jim McConville (440) 791-7017 WESTERN REGION Hutch Looney — hutch@hlooney.com MIDWEST REGION Mark Thiffault (720) 630-9863 EAST REGION Pat Bentzel (717) 695-8095 NATIONAL AD SALES ACCOUNT DIRECTOR—DETROIT OFFICE Kevin Donley (248) 798-4458 NATIONAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE—CHICAGO OFFICE Carl Benson (312) 955-0496 DIRECT RESPONSE ADVERTISING/NON-ENDEMIC Anthony Smyth (914) 693-8700…

3 min.
can’t beat the .300 h&h winchester model 70

I THOROUGHLY ENJOYED JOSEPH VON BENEDIKT’S COLUMN IN THE November 2019 issue on the Winchester Pre-’64 Model 70 .300 H&H. I was projecting my own experiences into the page as I read his words. Two years ago, when I learned I had an opportunity to hunt in South Africa, I knew I wanted a “traditional” safari caliber and quickly settled on the .300 H&H. The caliber choice left no doubt that the rifle had to be a Pre-’64 Model 70. After over a year of searching, I found one made in 1957 and in good condition. I mounted a Leupold VX-5HD 3-15X 56mm scope, worked up some handloads with the Swift 200-grain A-Frame bullet, and set off for the Kalahari in May 2019. On the seventh day I took a 57-inch…

2 min.
pachmayr shock shield

Pachmayr says its new Shock Shield is “the simple solution to reducing recoil in a variety of rifles and shotguns.” The one-size design stretches and contours to a variety of buttstock shapes and dimensions. It goes on easily and is easy to remove. The Shock Shield provides excellent felt recoil reduction by virtue of its interior pocket of soft gel. It’s been extensively tested and will provide years of use. It won’t scratch or mar buttstocks. And it features a no-slip face texture. MSRP: $19.98 lymanproducts.com Bear & Son 563 Small Stag Bone Hunter The new Bear & Son Cutlery 563 Small Stag Bone Hunter is an American-made knife built for hunters and trailblazers. The 2.88-inch, 440 stainless-steel blade resists rust, is easy to sharpen, and holds its edge. The knife features a…

2 min.
is a revolver a pistol?

Q : Is a revolver a pistol? It seems that various gun magazines use the two terms interchangeably, but other magazines do not. What do the experts at Shooting Times have to say on the matter? Mike Jarvis Via email A : I’ve been editing Shooting Times for a little more than 27 years, and during my tenure with the magazine, we have never used the term “pistol” when referring to a revolver. We do not consider a revolver to be a pistol. However, other publications may use the terms interchangeably. Here are definitions for the word “pistol” from three separate sources. From Firearms Encyclopedia by George C. Nonte Jr.: “Pistol: A term originally applied to all handguns, but now more or less limited to single-shot and autoloading designs. A firearm made or designed to…

4 min.
turnbull winchester model 1886

WINCHESTER’S MODEL 1886 WAS THE LAST OF THE company’s traditional-type lever-action big bores. Chambered for massive blackpowder cartridges, including the .40-82 WCF, .45-70 and .45-90 WCF, .50-110, and several others, it featured a strong, smooth, fast action. Thanks to the Model 1886’s action strength, it successfully made the transition from blackpowder to smokeless powder. Its only weakness was early on, in the mild steel barrels used for blackpowder loads which didn’t have adequate strength for smokeless-powder pressures. Around 1905, Winchester switched to using nickel-steel barrels, which were plenty strong for smokeless powder. Special-order rifles were common back then and often featured custom barrel lengths, shotgun butt-stocks, pistol grips, half-octagon/half-round barrel profiles, and shortened “button” magazines. Take-down versions were extremely popular with traveling sportsmen. Before being discontinued in 1935, about 160,000 Model 1886s…

5 min.
.35 remington

IN 1906 REMINGTON WAS ALREADY THE LEADER in semiautomatic and slide-action hunting rifles. The company designed a four-cartridge family of rimless rifle cartridges to compete head to head with those Winchester offered in its Model 1894 lever rifle. The .25, .30, and .32 Remingtons were direct challengers; they were essentially Winchester’s .25-35, .30-30, and .32 Winchester Special with the rims removed. Performance was almost identical to that of the Winchester rounds. The fourth member of this family, the .35 Remington, is the only one to survive to the present, and it is physically different. The .35 Rem. was developed on a case with a larger head diameter. Its three smaller siblings shared head diameters of about 0.420 inch; the .35 Rem. has a 0.457-inch head diameter. I’ve seen suggestions that the…