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Smithsonian MagazineSmithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine May 2019

Smithsonian Magazine takes you on a journey through history, science, world culture and technology with breathtaking images from around the world.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Smithsonian Institute
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$19.99
11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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smithsonian

SMITHSONIAN.COM EDITOR IN CHIEF Michael Caruso DEPUTY EDITOR Terence Monmaney ART DIRECTOR Maria G. Keehan DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL OPERATIONS Debra Rosenberg SENIOR EDITORS Kathleen M. Burke, Arik Gabbai, Jennie Rothenberg Gritz, April White CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Quentin A. Nardi COPY CHIEF Karen Larkins DIGITAL EDITOR, SMITHSONIAN.COM Brian Wolly COPY EDITOR Jeanne Maglaty ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Erik K. Washam PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR JeffCampagna DESIGNER Eritrea Dorcely ASSOCIATE PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Donny Bajohr CORRESPONDENTS JeffMacGregor, Ron Rosenbaum, Matthew Shaer, Abigail Tucker ART SERVICES COORDINATOR Tiffany Y. Ates CONTRIBUTORS Richard Conniff, Amy Crawford, Richard Grant, Joshua Hammer, Franz Lidz, Holly Millea, Michelle Nijhuis, Tony Perrottet, Paul Theroux, Clive Thompson ASSISTANT EDITOR Anna Diamond EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS N. Hamilton, Michelle Strange DIGITAL EDITOR, MUSEUMS Beth Py-Lieberman SENIOR WEB EDITOR Megan Gambino ASSOCIATE WEB EDITOR Jay Bennett ASSISTANT WEB EDITORS Rachael Lallensack, Jackie Mansky DIGITAL EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Lila Thulin INTERNS Jane Recker, Anna White…

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from the editors

READERS ROSE UP to support “America’s Second Revolution,” in our April issue, about the passage of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote 100 years ago. “I’m delighted to see women of color as your focus,” Judy Schultheis wrote. “They have been neglected for far too long.” J.R. Colon of Piedmont, California, said the “photographs from all types of women were very helpful and educational.” B. Kent Harrison of Provo, Utah, noted that the story “is a strong reminder that women’s rights have required much struggle in the past, and struggle continues to be needed.” Our interview with Robert Reid, mayor of Middletown, Pennsylvania, at the time of the Three Mile Island nuclear accident (“Meltdown”), provoked a reaction from John Elliott, who grew up there: “We weren’t…

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smithsonian magazine future con @awesome con

APRIL 26 – 28, 2019 WALTER E. WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER WASHINGTON, DC WHERE SCIENCE MEETS SCIENCE FICTION SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS INCLUDE MAX BROOKS Author of The Zombie Survival Guide and World War Z MARC GOODMAN Futurist, Global Strategist and author of The Future of Crime DR. ERIN MACDONALD Astrophysicist, Science Fiction Consultant, Aerospace Engineer and host of Dr. Erin Explains the Universe FEATURED PANELS SPACE HIDDEN WORLDS: JUPITER AND ITS MOONS ROBOTS IN SPACE: SCIENCE, EXPLORATION, AND THE SEARCH FOR LIFE PEERING INTO THE JAMES WEBB SPACE TELESCOPE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES: MONSTERS IN THE UNIVERSE! HUMANS INTELLIGENCE SUPER MODELS: 3D MODELING IN THE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY SCIENCE FICTION TO FACT: THE VOYAGE OF BIOMETRICS SPACE FOOD’S NEXT STEP: WHAT YOU’RE AFRAID TO ASK CRISPRING OUR WAY TO GATTACA POP CULTURE HARRY POTTER AND THE GENETICS OF WIZARDING SCIENCE OF AQUAMAN PUTTING THE POP CULTURE IN STEM EDUCATION FOR MORE INFORMATION & TO PURCHASE TICKETS Smithsonian.com/futurecon # FUTURECON…

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buzz words

LATER THIS MONTH, hundreds of kids from all over the United States and a handful of other countries will arrive in Washington, D.C., having sacrificed many hundreds of hours of free time to a singular kind of intensive study. In the most extreme cases, they will have tried to memorize every word in a nearly 3,000-page dictionary. I know the work they have put into preparing for their big day and the pressure they will be feeling, because I was one of them. In 1996, as a 12-year-old, I won my school spelling bee (I was home-schooled), a district bee and a grueling New York City regional finals under the bright lights of a large auditorium. Then I stood apprehensively on the stage of the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington…

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how to win a spelling bee

START EAR LY Contestants in the national competition must be under 15, and most champs have been 13 or 14. The youngest was 11 years old. (Only three first-timers have won since 1999.) STUDY, STUDY, STUDY In the year they compete in the national bee, kids train for almost 500 HOURS. Some, like the 2018 winner, hire a past competitor as a coach. V-I-C-T-O-R-Y BEWARE THE GRAY GHOS Memorize “metastasize,” “metonymy” and “Weimaraner,” the most commonly misspelled words of the last 22 YEARS. Double L’s are also a danger, tripping up 83 finalists since 1996. PLAY WITH WORDS How do you spell r-e-l-a-x-a-t-i-o-n? A 1986 survey reported that more than 80 percent of competitors kicked back by playing word games such as Scrabble and Boggle. HOPE FOR THE WORST An analysis of 13 YEARS of bee data found that a…

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torch song

WHEN the French sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi (1834-1904) sailed into New York Harbor just before dawn on June 21, 1871, he was seized by a “marvelous feeling of movement, animation.” The trans-Atlantic voyage had been rough, but it wasn’t only the thought of terra firma that roused his spirits. From the ship, he spotted a small island, “the ideal spot” for his planned masterwork, officially titled “Liberty Enlightening the World.” Funding, designing and building Bartholdi’s colossus would take 15 years and an army of workers who assembled the 225-ton iron frame, shaped 300 copper plates for the statue’s skin and manufactured 300,000 rivets to hold it together. (A visitor to his Paris workshop described “hammering, grinding noises of filing, clinking chains; everywhere agitation, a brouhaha, an enormous commotion.”) The final result…

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