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Space.com Collection

Space.com Collection

The Space.com Collection is packed with amazing astronomy, incredible discoveries and the latest missions from space agencies around the world. From distant galaxies, to the planets, moons and asteroids of our own solar system – you’ll discover a wealth of facts about the cosmos, and learn about the new technologies, telescopes and rockets in development that will reveal even more of its secrets. Space.com launched 20 years ago and fast became the premier source of space exploration, innovation and astronomy news, chronicling – and celebrating – humanity’s ongoing expansion across the final frontier. For us, exploring space is as much about the journey as it is the destination.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
welcome to the space.com collection

Get ready to explore the wonders of our incredible universe. The Space.com Collection is packed with amazing astronomy, incredible discoveries and the latest missions from space agencies around the world. From distant galaxies, to the planets, moons and asteroids of our own solar system – you’ll discover a wealth of facts about the cosmos, and learn about the new technologies, telescopes and rockets in development that will reveal even more of its secrets. Space.com launched 20 years ago and fast became the premier source of space exploration, innovation and astronomy news, chronicling – and celebrating – humanity’s ongoing expansion across the final frontier. For us, exploring space is as much about the journey as it is the destination.…

1 min.
space.com collection

Future PLC Richmond House, 33 Richmond Hill, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH2 6EZ Space.com Collection Editorial Editor Jacqueline Snowden Designer Steve Dacombe Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Space.com Editorial VP of Content and Global Editor-in-Chief Bill Gannon Managing Editor Tariq Malik Cover images NASA, ESA, Thinkstock Photography NASA, ESA, Thinkstock, Getty Images All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Distributed by Marketforce, 5 Churchill Place, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HU www.marketforce.co.uk Tel: 0203 787 9001 Space.com Collection Volume…

4 min.
most amazing space photos of 2019

Swimming through a group of galaxies more than 200 million light-years away from Earth is the so-called “jellyfish” galaxy named ESO 137-001. This celestial jellyfish is a spiral galaxy much like the Milky Way, but it has long “tentacles” of hot gas streaming away from the galactic disk. Scientists aren’t sure how the gas is being stripped away, but NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope may be able to shed some light on the origin of those tentacles by studying them in unprecedented detail after its planned launch in 2021. This view combines visible-light imagery from the Hubble Space Telescope and X-ray data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Colorful cosmic “fireworks” decorate the night sky over the La Silla observatory in Chile in this gorgeous image by the European Southern Observatory’s resident…

7 min.
what is the big bang theory?

The Big Bang theory is the leading explanation about how the universe began. At its simplest, it says the universe as we know it started with a small singularity, then inflated over the next 13.8 billion years to the cosmos that we know today. Because current instruments don’t allow astronomers to peer back at the universe’s birth, much of what we understand about the Big Bang theory comes from mathematical formulas and models. Astronomers can, however, see the “echo” of the expansion through a phenomenon known as the cosmic microwave background. While the majority of the astronomical community accepts the theory, there are some theorists who have alternative explanations besides the Big Bang – such as eternal inflation or an oscillating universe. The phrase “Big Bang theory” has been popular among astrophysicists for…

3 min.
alternatives to the big bang theory explained

Nearly 14 billion years ago, there was nothing and nowhere. Then, all of a sudden, due to a random fluctuation in a completely empty void, a universe exploded into existence. Something the size of a subatomic particle inflated to an unimaginably huge size in a fraction of a second, driven apart by negative-pressure vacuum energy. Scientists call this theory for the origin of the universe the Big Bang. What we call the “observable universe” (or the “Hubble Volume”) is the spherical region, about 90 billion light-years in diameter, that is centered on any given observer. This is the only part of the universe in which light has had time to reach the observer in the 13.8 billion years since the universe began. Since the universe’s expansion is accelerating, objects are being dragged…

5 min.
cosmic microwave background

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is thought to be leftover radiation from the Big Bang, or the time when the universe began. As the theory goes, when the universe was born it underwent a rapid inflation and expansion. The universe is still expanding today, and the expansion rate appears different depending on where you look. The CMB represents the heat left over from the Big Bang. You can’t see the CMB with your naked eye, but it is everywhere in the universe. It is invisible to humans because it is so cold, just 2.725 degrees above absolute zero (minus 459.67 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 273.15 degrees Celsius.) This means its radiation is most visible in the microwave part of the electromagnetic spectrum. ORIGINS AND DISCOVERY The universe began 13.8 billion years ago, and…