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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Home & Garden
Successful Farming

Successful Farming February 2019

Successful Farming magazine serves the diverse business, production, and family information needs of families who make farming and ranching their business. Get Successful Farming digital magazine subscription today and learn how to make money, save time, and grow your satisfaction in the farming business. True to its name, Successful Farming magazine is all about success. Every issue is packed with ideas readers can take right to the field, barn, shop, and office to increase their profit and to position their farming business for growth and success in the competitive and global industry of agriculture.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

2 min.
farmer george

Americans admire George Washington, especially this month, when we celebrate Presidents’ Day on February 18. I found an interesting read on Washington in an April 1920 story from our own magazine archives. Here are a few tidbits about our first president and his ag operation. • He liked to be known as a farmer. “His greatest pride,” wrote a guest at Mount Vernon in 1795, “is to be thought the first farmer in America.” Of the 46 years that Washington lived in Mount Vernon, 23 were spent as an actual farmer. • Washington was a true innovator. He was an early and active proponent of crop rotations. At the time, Virginia farmers grew tobacco on the same soil year after year. Washington, “the master of Mount Vernon,” observed that practice “to be ruinous…

3 min.
bob reiter

A DNA chip the size of a quarter reveals much about how plant breeding has advanced since Bob Reiter joined Bayer’s legacy company Monsanto back in 1998. The DNA chip holds information from 14 acres of field research that Bayer CropScience uses to make breeding program decisions. “That would have been unfathomable 20 years ago,” says Reiter, who now heads research and development for Bayer CropScience. He sees plant breeding progress accelerating due to gene editing. Last year, Bayer CropScience and a firm called Pairwise formed a collaboration to research ways to use tools like CRSPR-Cas9 to produce new gene-edited crop products. “This is technology I believe will, in the long run, fundamentally reshape plant breeding,” says Reiter. Reiter, who held a similar position for Monsanto, sees last year’s acquisition of Monsanto also speeding…

1 min.
gleanings

COMMODITY CLASSIC 2019 THE SUCCESSFUL FARMING TEAM WILL SEE YOU IN ORLANDO FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 2. STOP BY THE 2019 COMMODITY CLASSIC MAIN STAGE PRESENTED BY SUCCESSFUL FARMING AND SEE SOME EXCELLENT SPEAKERS AND KEYNOTE MESSAGES. The first Commodity Classic was held in Phoenix in 1996 THE 2019 TRADE SHOW WILL FEATURE MORE THAN 390 COMPANIES AND 2,100 BOOTHS 75% OF FARMERS ATTENDING CONSIDER THEMSELVES EARLY ADOPTERS 2,850 total acres: The average farm operation size of farmer attendees Attendees came from 46 states, the District of Columbia, and 3 foreign countries in 2018 THE 2019 COMMODITY CLASSIC OFFERS 40+ EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS AND PRESENTATIONS THE MAIN STAGE IS BROUGHT TO YOU WITH THE HELP OF THESE SPONSORS: Sources: USDA, Economic Research Services, Food Dollar Series Artwork: FoxysGraphic, iStockphoto.com…

7 min.
storm watcher

The first repeat chairman of the House Agriculture Committee since the Eisenhower era, Collin Peterson of Minnesota says there’s plenty to do this year. It includes closer scrutiny of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, who had a free hand for nearly two years in redrawing the organizational tree at USDA. “There is a new Farm Bill to implement, a growing economic storm in farm country, and the ongoing harm of a trade war to alleviate, not to mention the range of unforeseen issues that will test the mettle of the people we’re here to serve,” he says. The guitar-playing, outspoken chairman circulated a meaty two-page list of topics for the panel to pursue. “Much of the work in 2019 will focus on oversight of implementation of the 2018 Farm Bill,” it said.…

5 min.
weathering a financial storm

This month, we’re midway through farm loan renewal season, according to a farmer friend of mine in southwest Iowa who is on his bank’s board of directors. Some borrowers were already approved for credit last fall, and it could be March or April for others, he says. This is a season of discontent for some. As 2018 ended, the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City reported a “modest deterioration” in farmers’ short-term operating funds (or working capital) after it surveyed ag bankers in seven states. The most important difference is that many farms are still chugging along with positive margins, even if they are razor thin. Most of you will get operating loans for this summer, of course. But if your banker is showing some reluctance or skepticism about how you’re going to repay…

3 min.
cheese ambassadors

Last May, Rachel Freund and her partner, Cole Van Seters, set out on a “quarter-life crisis” adventure in a red-and-black plaid van. With help from Cabot Creamery, the couple’s mission was to commit Random Acts of Cheddar, thanking volunteers with gifts of cheese in communities across the country. They also hosted public sampling events along the route. After graduating from college, Freund managed herd health and breeding on her family’s dairy farm. The farm is a member of Cabot Creamery Cooperative; the milk is turned into the company’s signature sharp cheddar cheeses. ROAD-TRIPPING AMBASSADOR “What am I doing with my life?” Freund recalls asking herself prior to the trip. “I decided I needed to take a break to explore something outside of where I’ve been living and to decide if this is where…