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Successful FarmingSuccessful Farming

Successful Farming May 2019

Successful Farming magazine serves the diverse business, production, and family information needs of families who make farming and ranching their business. Get Successful Farming digital magazine subscription today and learn how to make money, save time, and grow your satisfaction in the farming business. True to its name, Successful Farming magazine is all about success. Every issue is packed with ideas readers can take right to the field, barn, shop, and office to increase their profit and to position their farming business for growth and success in the competitive and global industry of agriculture.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
across the editor’s desk®

WHEN DISASTER STRIKES FARMERS COPE WITH RAVAGED FARMS WHEN FLOODING STRIKES MISSOURI RIVER BASIN. Our news team sprung into action the weekend that the Bomb Cyclone struck the Upper Midwest, dumping inches of water on Nebraska, Iowa, and other parts of the region. What resulted caused billions of dollars of damage and pummeled an already struggling farm economy. The photo above was taken shortly after the devastating events. Over the next days and weeks, our team covered every dimension of the disaster on our website, Agriculture.com. From personal stories of a farmer killed when his tractor was swept away in the floodwater, to finding resources to help farmers recover, we have covered it. And, rest assured, we will continue to. To read the farmer profile and links to other coverage, go to Agriculture.com/wilke. Stories…

access_time2 min.
successful farming

EDITORIAL Successful Farming Magazine, 1716 Locust Street/LS257, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023 | Email: adminsf@meredith.com EDITORIAL CONTENT DIRECTOR Dave Kurns ART & PRODUCTION CREATIVE DIRECTOR Matt Strelecki COPY & PRODUCTION MANAGER Janis Gandy MACHINERY EXECUTIVE EDITOR Dave Mowitz AG TECHNOLOGY EXECUTIVE EDITOR Laurie Bedord AGRONOMY & TECHNOLOGY EDITOR Megan Vollstedt CROPS EXECUTIVE EDITOR Gil Gullickson CROPS EDITOR Bill Spiegel BUSINESS, MARKETING, & RISK MANAGEMENT EXECUTIVE EDITOR Betsy Freese MARKETING EDITOR Mike McGinnis CONTENT EDITOR Paula Barbour MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Jodi Henke FAMILY & FARMSTEAD EDITOR Lisa Foust Prater VIDEO SENIOR PRODUCER & CUSTOM SOLUTIONS David Ekstrom DIGITAL DIGITAL CONTENT DIRECTOR Jessie Scott DIGITAL CONTENT EDITOR Natalina Sents EDITORIAL OFFICE COORDINATOR Diana Weesner CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Gene Johnston, Al Kluis, Dan Looker, Cheryl Tevis, John Walter EDITORIAL APPRENTICES Austin Anderson, Josh Cook, Amanda Karges PUBLISHING ADMINISTRATION / ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR OF REVENUE Courtney Yuskis NATIONAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Tyler Smith, Tom Hosack REGIONAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Brian Keane, Collin Coughlon DIGITAL OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Katie Eggers DIGITAL CAMPAIGN SPECIALIST Alyssa…

access_time1 min.
gleanings

5/20/19 World Bee Day Pollination brings in $235 to $577 billion per year in global food production. One honey bee can produce 1/12 teaspoon of honey in its lifetime. Agricultural production dependent on pollinators has increased by 300% in the last 50 years. About 40% of invertebrate pollinator species – particularly bees and butterflies – are facing extinction. The majority of pollinators are wild, including over 20,000 species of bees. Pollinators affect 35% of global agricultural land, supporting production of 87 of the leading food crops worldwide. Bees pollinate as many as 170,000 species of plants. Every third spoonful of food is dependent on pollination. Data Source: Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food; Photography: Antagain, Getty Images…

access_time1 min.
successful farming at agriculture.com

SOIL HEALTH: THE JOURNEY FROM DIRT TO SOIL Gabe Brown struggled with Mother Nature. After 10 years of wet springs, dry summers, hailstorms, and bills to pay, Brown decided there had to be a better way. This is the story of his family’s journey to soil health and the book he wrote to help others. Listen to Brown’s story as well as our other podcasts by subscribing to the Successful Farming Podcast. Hover your phone’s camera over this smart code to subscribe. You can select your favorite place to listen to podcasts, whether that’s Apple, Google Play, or Spotify. APPLE GOOGLE PLAY SPOTIFY AGRICULTURE.COM POLL: HOW MANY 2019 INPUTS DID YOU BUY IN 2018? STAY CONNECTED: Successful Farming @SuccessfulFarm successful_farming successfulfarm…

access_time4 min.
q&a: dennis gartman

Dennis Gartman can stir things up. His daily commentary on global capital markets, The Gartman Letter, addresses political, economic, and technical trends. We caught up with Gartman to see what’s on his mind. (There is good news for farmers.) SF: What is top of mind? DG: Trade tariffs, fears of trade tariffs, and rumors of trade tariffs. This is a very strange president and he is likely to do anything and everything. SF: What if additional tariffs do go into place? DG: Then it’s devastation. Tariffs are a nasty, vile, horrifying, stupid, illogical, dumb decision. They are devastating to the farming community, to land values, to the stock market, and to the economy, in general. SF: President Donald Trump still has support among farmers. DG: Strangely enough, a large component of his base is the farming…

access_time6 min.
first cut

TAKING IT BACK SENATORS AIM TO REIN IN PRESIDENTIAL TARIFFS. A year ago, Bob Corker was a quixotic figure in the Senate, a lame-duck Republican who pursued trade-law reform despite the personal opposition of President Trump. Corker retired in January, but a sizable number of senators, including dogged Finance Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, are trying again to limit the power of the president to unilaterally impose tariffs in the name of national security. Trump used so-called Section 232 power to put high tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, which prompted retaliatory tariffs by Canada and Mexico, who account for one third of U.S. food and ag trade. While the continued tariffs quickly became a ground-level issue in the drive to ratify the new NAFTA, senators speak more abstractly of constitutional checks and balances…

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