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SurferSurfer

Surfer October 2017

We founded Surfer Magazine in 1960 with a mission: to bring our readers a slice of the entire surfing world with each issue. And for over four decades, we've made good on that promise. Every issue of Surfer is packed with spectacular award-winning photos, provocative interviews with the leading pros, and journeys to the coolest undiscovered surf spots. With your order you'll get the Annual Oversized Issue, the Buyer's Guide, and the Hot 100, featuring the world's best new surfers.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Media Operations, Inc
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8 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time3 min.
editor’s note

I couldn’t stop laughing on the inside as I watched Torrey Meister fly down the line on a chunky right-hander at NLand Surf Park, trying to keep a shiny white cowboy hat firmly affixed to his head in a stiff offshore wind. He managed to keep it in place as he approached the middle section of the wave, but moments after drifting his fins at the lip, the hat flew off and rode the breeze across the pool, where Albee Layer picked it up and put it on for his next wave. And so it became a sort of game for the rest of the session, with everyone trying as hard as they could to complete a wave while wearing a Texan head ornament. There’s been a lot of talk about…

access_time2 min.
rise of the machines

WICHITA, Kan. — FLYover Surf, the newly opened artificial-wave park in Wichita, Kan., had to close its doors after the computer program used to control the size and shape of the wave suffered an “existential malfunction,” according to staff. “My son Timmy and I were in the pool surfing the left, just waiting for one of those ruler-edge-perfect tubes we’d seen on FLYover’s Instagram, and then it happened,” says visiting Gulf Coast surfer Ron Jenkinson. “A 20-footer came out of nowhere and broke right on top of us. It washed Timmy and me all the way out of the pool and clear past the hot-dog stand — nearly killed us!” According to FLYover engineers and scientists, they had been facing extreme pressure from investors to make larger and hollower waves in order…

access_time10 min.
do something

MAKE YOUR OWN SURF FILMS WITH Thomas Campbell “Get out there and make some shit.” That about sums up Thomas Campbell’s advice for would-be surf filmmakers. Or artists. Or musicians. Or anyone who wants to get creative, really. Known for his soulful, quirkily fun take on the alternative surfcraft scene, Campbell’s made some of the best surf films of the past couple decades: “The Seedling,” “Sprout” and “The Present.” He’s also a well-respected visual artist with gallery showings in posh art districts in the world’s coolest cities. According to Campbell, none of that would have happened had he sat around and wondered, “Is my art any good?” Campbell got his start in surf filmmaking 20 years ago. “I was filming a movie with my friends back in 1996 called ‘Blue Fucking Corduroy, Man!’”…

access_time4 min.
oscar billy pippen wright, 41

“If you can keep that childish spirit alive in yourself, you’ll keep having the best time in the water. ” Some things never change. As a kid, I was non-stop drawing and skating and surfing. I was lost in my own world, played like a maniac, and got super obsessed with whatever I did. So essentially there’s no difference at all between me as a kid and me as an adult. Some surfers just aren’t cut out for contests. In the ’90s I was all about contests, and the best result I ever had was finishing second to Chris Davidson in the Aussie Titles. The last contest I surfed was the Padang Cup, and I didn’t get out of my first heat. I had Flynn Novak in my heat, and I remember…

access_time6 min.
warts and all

When it comes to my own DIY ethos, I’d drawn a line well in front of making surfboards. Sure, I’ll brew my own beer, ferment my own sauerkraut and wrench on my own truck like the flannel-wearing, beard-growing, walking Northern California stereotype I am, but when it comes to surfboards, I’ll take one off the rack, thank you very much. Why spend a bunch of time and money hacking away at a piece of foam to make a board that’s probably going to be misshapen and barely rideable when there are perfectly good boards for sale at the shop down the street? Or even a custom order form away? My interest in picking up a planer started only because I had a vague idea for a board I’d always wanted to…

access_time17 min.
if you build it, they will surf

It was before 8 a.m. at NLand Surf Park just outside of Austin, Texas, and wispy clouds of steam rose from the warm surface of the water, condensing in the still-cool spring air. Without a breath of wind, the water mirrored the slate-gray sky and the chain-link-wrapped pier pilings that cut through the center of the pool. Suddenly, loudspeakers surrounding the pool crackled to life with the rhythmic drum-and-clap intro to Johnny Cash’s moody classic “God’s Gonna Cut You Down.” Just as Cash’s deep, haunting drawl came through the sound system, another noise rose above it — a high-pitched whir like the sound of a spacecraft from a sci-fi movie getting ready to push its engines past light speed. Under the pier, steel cables and wheels began to move at a…

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