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Tatler UKTatler UK

Tatler UK October 2018

Tatler is mischievous, glamorous, intelligent and fun, providing an insider’s view of what is really happening in British society with a compelling mix of fashion, the arts, politics, people, parties and glamour.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast Publications Ltd
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$43.47
12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
the ascot of ’18

Queen Alexandra brought jewellery and beaded embroidered coats, then there was Queen Mary’s distinctive toque hat, but this year Ascot belonged to the Duchess of Sussex, a Hepburn-esque vision in Givenchy and Philip Treacy. Huge cheers erupted from the parade ring on the first day of the Royal Meeting as she arrived with the Duke of Sussex and the Queen.The five-day spectacle saw Ciara bringing megastar glamour in an Edeline Lee belted white dress and the Duke of Marlborough holding court by the White’s tent. Singer and presenter Alexandra Burke cut an elegant figure in white, charming her host, Ascot trustee Sir Francis Brooke. The Niarchos family’s Alpha Centauri won Coronation Stakes in record time, Ariana Rockefeller put in a bid for best-dressed, while Amanda Wakeley’s hat, faintly reminiscent of…

access_time1 min.
parties

Guests by the poolEleanor LloydSusanna Flory, Will Coleridge & Jack Williams-EllisBen Harris & Finlay ThompsonCisco PosadaMIDSUMMER MADNESSThere were donkey ears and floral headbands aplenty at Eleanor Lloyd’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream-themed 21st in the Cotswolds, where bright young things (mostly Bristol undergraduates) revelled on one of the longest, warmest nights Britain has seen for decades. The party continued until 10am (Humphrey Codrington and Douglas Wolfenden took the prize for best dancers) with guests invigorated by a dawn round of rosé, bacon butties and skinny-dipping. A rare vision indeed.The Long LibraryLord & Lady Edward Spencer-ChurchillMelusine RuspoliGoga Ashkenazi (PHOTOGRAPHS: INSTAGRAM/@MELUSINERUSPOLI/@SHERMINESHAHRIVAR/@WILLOWCROSSLEYCREATES/@GOGA_VIONNET)HIGH STYLEIt was a busy week at Blenheim – the Duke of Marlborough’s brother, Eddie Spencer-Churchill, married Kimi Hammerstroem – and Donald Trump dined with Theresa May.Laurent Feniou & the Duke of RichmondJosh…

access_time5 min.
the image of discretion

The new Marchioness of Bristol currently faces something of a dilemma. As an art consultant specialising in modern, post-war and contemporary work, she’s more Richter than Reynolds – unlike her husband, whose taste is ‘very English’, and who, as the pair build a collection together, is bringing a lot of ancestors with him. But negotiating is what Meredith (née Dunn) does best. ‘It actually feels sometimes that I’m like Switzerland,’ she says speaking on the phone from New York, where she has been meeting clients.‘You have to balance the client and whoever you’re buying from. It’s like a tightrope.’ And then there’s the diplomacy required to reckon with a client’s (not always stellar) taste: ‘There was one who had some paintings in the house that I wasn’t so keen on,’…

access_time8 min.
before the gold rush

Young British Artists, from left, Ian Davenport, Damien Hirst, Angela Bulloch, Fiona Rae, Stephen Park, Anya Gallaccio, Sarah Lucas and Gary Hume, at the Freeze exhibition private view, August 1988Michael Craig-Martin, Grenville Davey and Damien Hirst, 1995MICHAEL CRAIG-MARTINGoldsmiths tutorI was 32 and in need of a teaching post. I’d had success as a conceptual artist – my first solo exhibition was at Rowan Gallery – but it was making little money.In the early Seventies, London had many excellent and internationally known art schools: the Royal College, the Slade, Saint Martins, Chelsea, Camberwell. All had long and rich histories and were in enviably grand locations. Goldsmiths was not one of them. It was in New Cross, far from the city centre and, having developed from a teacher-training college, was modest and…

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class of 2018

ARTHUR STUDHOLME, 22Arthur specialises in video installation. For his degree show, he filmed locations in London over a six-month period and cut the footage to reveal a city constantly changing. After working on film sets as a runner, his dream is to be a director.REBEKAH BIDE, 23Born in Perth, Australia, Rebekah will take up an art residency this month, in St Erme, France. Her mediums are video and installations, as well as performance. She is also planning an exhibition in London for October.FLORENCE PICK, 22Winner of Goldsmiths’ Artist Prize 2018, Florence’s degree show was a kitchen-sink comedy set in Mansfield, where she was raised. The £1,000 prize will go towards performing at Edinburgh Fringe. For now, she works in a record shop.CAMILLA BACH, 25A photographer born in Trieste, Camilla moved…

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the one & only

IN THE SWINGPeggy Guggenheim on her terracebeing photographed by Stefan Moses in St Mark’s Square, 1969Peggy Guggenheim was a one-off. In 1969, at 71, the epoch-defining art collector was living in a waterside palazzo (now better known as the Guggenheim Venice), spending her days surrounded by her vast art collection and navigating the canals in her carmine speedboat. She was never without her Lhasa Apso dogs, nor her Edward Melcarth sunglasses, shaped like butterfly wings.This month, a new photo book, Encounters with Peggy Guggenheim, recalls those years through the lens of photographer Stefan Moses, who often stayed with her. By then, Peggy had many stories for her guests: of dinners with Marlon Brando; days in bed with Samuel Beckett; tales of the Picassos and de Koonings, her Rothkos and the…

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