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Texas Highways MagazineTexas Highways Magazine

Texas Highways Magazine October 2016

Texas Highways, the official travel magazine of Texas, encourages recreational travel within Texas and tells the Texas story to readers around the world. Renowned for its photography, statewide events coverage, top weekend excursions, off-the-beaten path discoveries, and scenic destinations, Texas Highways helps readers discover the treasures of the Lone Star State.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Texas Department of Transportation
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
change is in the air

WHILE FALL OFFICIALLY arrived on September 22, most of us in Texas start feeling the season’s change in October, when shortening days seem to intensify the other classic hallmarks of autumn—the roar of a hometown football game, the promise of a bowl of chili on a crisp evening, beating the squirrels to fallen pecans, and reveling in Texas’ sometimes-elusive fall color. Fall color is a tricky thing in Texas. Dependent on a delicate balance of rainfall, sunlight, and temperature, the color transformation is primarily the result of a disappearance of chlorophyll, which reveals the leaves’ other pigments. But more often than not, autumn puts on a subtle show in Texas; consider the photo above, which highlights the cypress trees lining the Frio River at Garner State Park. “Beginning in mid- to…

access_time3 min.
merge

CAROL BARLOW, PLANO GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? OUR FAVORITE SOCIAL MEDIA OF THE MONTH A True Texan is an independent cuss who does as he likes, but will step up in a heartbeat to help out neighbors and strangers alike in times of need. PETE SOMMERS, BASTROP I’m beyond honored to be part of of @TexasHighways Extraordinary Texans list. Lucy the dog is too. DALE BLASINGAME, @daleblasingame Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram Texas IQ Points We’re Oregonians now, but as native New Mexicans, my wife and I loved your “Are You A True Texan?” quiz [September]. We actually didn’t have to get a rope. The one that caught our eyes was No. 25: Married in Texas? We added 10 points for being married in a county courthouse by a county judge (Jeff Davis County Courthouse in 1969…

access_time1 min.
big bend country

31º 53' 47.92" N 104º 49' 41.75" W DEVIL’S HALL TRAIL in Guadalupe Mountains National Park presents a spectacular hike in the fall when the bigtooth maples change colors. The 4.2-mile, round-trip trek begins at a trailhead near the Pine Springs Campground, heads into Pine Springs Canyon, and climbs up natural rock steps. The trail gets its name from a narrow canyon at the end of the route where hikers turn around to head back. You’ll also find fall color displays at McKittrick Canyon, on the northeastern edge of the park. www.nps.gov/gumo…

access_time5 min.
lost and found

WHEN MY FAMILY MOVED TO Texas from Michigan in the summer of 2014, I was still reeling from the loss of my mother, gone suddenly from my life at age 64, just six months earlier. Our move to Austin seemed like a way to start fresh and heal the pain with a heavy dose of sunshine and good music. Instead, without my mother’s love as my compass, I often felt lost in a strange new place with two young children of my own. Perhaps in search of emotional distraction, I found myself increasingly drawn to the Mexican cultural traditions characteristic of my new home. I spent numerous mornings lingering at the Mexic-Arte Museum, a showcase for Mexican art and culture in downtown Austin, and seeking out ballet folklórico performances. And…

access_time5 min.
nature by day … or night

THE SUN IS LOW AND THE GATE GUARDED AS WE arrive at the south shore of Lewisville Lake, some 30 miles north of downtown Dallas. Officially, the Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area is closed for the day. But my traveling companion and I are here for one of the guided night hikes. So the volunteer manning the gate checks our names and waves us through. As we drive along the gravel road, a steep, grassy slope towers on our left. On the far side of this earthen dam, the lake presses like a huge, three-toed dinosaur footprint into the path of the Trinity River’s Elm Fork. To our right stretches the 2,685 acres of protected prairie, forest, and wetlands that make up the Lewisville Lake Environmental Learning Area (LLELA). Steigman likens the…

access_time6 min.
hauntings and history

IT’S A WARM EVENING, AND I’VE JOINED A GROUP of about 20 people gathering inside the breezeway of a two-story building a block or so from Seguin’s town square. The structure has seen better days, a lot of them, and we’re here to hear about some of those days. You could also say that we’ve come to hear about some of its worst days. “Are you ready for the ghosts? I am.” With that, co-owner Erin Wallace Ghedi pushes apart a set of sliding wooden doors and leads us into the Smoking Room, where she begins telling the story of the Magnolia Hotel. “This is where a two-room log cabin was built, around 1840, by Texas Ranger and Seguin co-founder James Campbell,” Erin says, as we gaze around a room filled with…

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