EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Health & Fitness
The Art of Healing

The Art of Healing

Vol 3 Issue 72

We do have a few articles on COVID-19 in our latest issue for Spring 2020, which include herd immunity, the immune response, how far-UVC light can safely kill airborne coronaviruses, and an extract from Dr Michael Mosley’s latest book COVID-19: What You Need To Know About The Coronavirus And The Race For The Vaccine. This issue also has a very valuable article on how to stress less and tips on stress management by Matthew Johnstone. We bring a lot more art and imagery into this issue as well, to demonstrate how imagery can also heal, with a fabulous profile on Spanish artist Antonio Mora, and an extract from 108 Days, 108 Ways by author and wellness consultant Libby Perkins. The profile on Annie Morabito many will find useful as well. Annie describes herself as a grief and loss counsellor or end-of-life companion and is an example of a very special person to have in your community. Last but not least (there is lots more) Andrew Jobling talks about his life journey and shares some of the wisdom he has gained on how to live a well life. This issue is in-store 10 Sept 2020 until the end of November 2020.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
LEGIT PUBLICATIONS
Frequency:
Quarterly
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4 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
contributors

FRONT COVER IMAGE: Les Lunettes Acos ARTIST: Antonio Mora WEBSITE: www.mylovt.com FACEBOOK: facebook.com/antonio.moradiez.1 INSTRAGRAM: a.morartworks Thank you to all the writers, organisations, and people we interviewed for their time and contributions to this magazine including: • Dr Michael Mosley • Simon & Schuster • Matthew Johnstone • Dr Michael Player • Macmillan Australia • Andrew Jobling • Rockpool Publishing • Libby Perkins • Mia Ferreira • Annie Morabito • Ellie Bullen • Plum Publishing WEBSITES YOU MIGHT LIKE TO VISIT: • mindbodygreen.com • wakingtimes.com • wakeup-world.com • mercola.com • uq.edu.au • neurosciencenews.com • greatergoodberkeley.edu • sciencedaily.com • physoc.org DISCLAIMER: All material provided in this magazine should be used as a guide only. Information provided should not be construed or used as a substitute for professional or medical advice. We would suggest that a healthcare professional should be consulted before adopting any opinions or suggestions contained in this magazine. Whilst every care is taken to compile and check articles…

2 min.
editor’s note

As I am writing this, the state government for Victoria where I live, has announced new stay at home restrictions for a signification portion of Melbourne for the next 6 weeks – from mid-July to August 2020. Over this period, people who live in specific areas are only allowed to go out for four reasons: shopping for food and supplies, health care and caregiving, outdoor exercise, and study or work. And whilst this directive is I guess heartening as the most wise and sensible thing to do at this moment (there has been a significant increase in COVID-19 cases over the last week in Victoria), it is also heart-rending to think of all the people who will be affected by this in so many ways. Many are dealing with just the…

2 min.
agave syrup vs. honey: how are they made and which is more healthy?

At a time when many people are opting for more natural sweeteners, it can be hard to tell which are healthy and which are just masquerading as a better-for-you option. This can be especially confusing when it comes to the seemingly similar choices, like agave and honey. Is one healthier than the other, or is it just personal preference? “Agave syrup requires processing before you can consume,” says registered dietitian Ella Davar, R.D., CDN. To make it, fluid is extracted from the blue agave plant, filtered, heated, and reduced to a syrup consistency, she explains. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 1 teaspoon of agave syrup or nectar contains 21.4 calories, 5.27 grams of carbohydrates, and 4.69 grams of sugar. The amount of sugar is indicative of the glycaemic index…

1 min.
water injections to relieve back pain in labour no longer ‘midwifery voodoo’

Dr Nigel Lee from the UQ School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work said the injections were previously seen as controversial but this study shows they are safe and effective. “Some midwives have used this practice in order to provide pain relief for a number of years, however until now, there has only been limited research to suggest that it works,“ Dr Lee said. “In fact, many hospitals refused to support the procedure, viewing it as ‘midwifery voodoo’. “This research provides definitive evidence that water injections offer effective pain relief for the majority of women with labour back pain.” Data was collected between 2012 and 2017 in one British and 15 Australian maternity units. More than one thousand women in labour with severe back pain were given either water injections or a…

3 min.
extraordinary ocean creatures use mucus to help remove carbon and microplastics

One of those animals is the giant larvaceans, which inhabit seas around the world. As reported by the Los Angeles Times reported, an enormous balloon of mucus about three feet wide often surrounds these squishy tadpole-like animals, and researchers have recently discovered that they play an enormous role in helping the ocean remove planet-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Another study conducted by researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and published in the journal Nature, used a novel laser system to provide 3D imaging of the deep sea animals and their mucous filters. The animals range in size from less than one centimetre in length to a maximum size of nearly 10 centimetres. However despite their insubstantial bodies, larvaceans can remove vast amounts of carbon-rich food out of the…

3 min.
ginkgo biloba benefits brain health and kidney function

Even skeptics have been swayed by Ginkgo’s ability to support the brain, kidneys, and other body systems. Curt W., an art director from North Carolina, started taking Ginkgo after reading an article about its potential to promote concentration. “I’m not a big supplement guy, so I wasn’t expecting much. But after a month or so of taking Ginkgo extract, I started noticing a difference in my ability to focus. Now I tell all my friends about it.” Let’s take a closer look at this ancient plant, and explore some of the many ways it supports wellness. WHAT IS GINGKO? Native to China but cultivated worldwide, Ginkgo biloba (also called the maidenhair tree) can grow to be over 100 feet tall. The trees themselves can live for 1,000 years, thanks to an unusually…