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category_outlined / Celebrity & Gossip
The Hollywood ReporterThe Hollywood Reporter

The Hollywood Reporter Emmy Special Issue 20A June 2019

The all-new Hollywood Reporter offers unprecedented access to the people, studios, networks and agencies that create the magic in Hollywood. Published weekly, the oversized format includes exceptional photography and rich features.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Prometheus Global Media
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48 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
category confusion creeps in

In a quest to recognize the massive quantity and variety of programming in Peak TV, the TV Academy has created so many categories that they have to be presented over three nights, two known as the Primetime Creative Arts Emmys (recognizing mostly technical and crafts work) and the third as the Primetime Emmys. Some categories are incredibly specific, such as makeup for a multicamera series or special (non-prosthetic); others, like drama series, are straightforward. But there is a lot of gray area in between, within which Emmy hopefuls seek their strongest position, resulting in some situations that may seem puzzling. Consider Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale. Season one won best drama series in 2017, season two was nominated in 2018 and season three, which drops June 5, won’t be eligible until 2020…

access_time11 min.
‘i remember thinking, she is a total badass’

Caitriona Balfe Claire Fraser Outlander (Starz) Claire and Jamie (Sam Heughan) found themselves stranded after a tumultuous storm at the end of season three. As they build a new home together in North Carolina in season four, Claire’s worlds collide when their daughter, Brianna (Sophie Skelton), travels through time to save her parents. WHEN WAS A TIME YOU THOUGHT YOUR CHARACTER WAS A BADASS? When I get moments to have Claire on the fly be her surgeon self and do something quite fantastic, those always feel quite gratifying — those kind of personal heroic moments in her fight against injustice and things like that. IS THERE ANYTHING ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER YOU’RE STILL CURIOUS ABOUT? The beauty about being on season five of a show is that you get to evolve. The character gets to evolve. That’s…

access_time1 min.
a night king slayer, a killer lawyer and a sly shrink

Audra McDonald The Good Fight (CBS All Access) Six-time Tony winner McDonald tackled a meaty season. In the opening episode of season three alone, Liz Reddick-Lawrence’s personal and professional lives implode after a startling revelation about her late father unspools. Maggie Siff Billions (Showtime) Resident psychiatrist Wendy Rhoades’ superpower may be her X-ray vision about others, but she has blinders on when it comes to herself. Season four sees the power player testing her oath as an M.D. to “do no harm.” Indya Moore Pose (FX) Moore scored all 10s with her portrayal of the sensitive, showstopping member of the House of Evangelista. Owning her worth on and off the ballroom floor, Moore’s Angel revolutionized trans representation. Maisie Williams Game of Thrones (HBO) No one, she is not. Arya Stark was MVP of the Battle of Winterfell, defeating the Night King.…

access_time4 min.
hail the queen in the north

Sophie Turner made her professional acting debut as Sansa Stark on HBO’s Game of Thrones back in 2010, when she was just 14 years old. With the series’ May 19 finale, the 23-year-old actress’ character secured her rule in the North, and Turner closed this chapter in her career (she’ll soon appear in the next X-Men installment, Dark Phoenix). Turner spoke to THR about Sansa’s royal ending, her tearfilled final day and why she’s ready to say goodbye to Westeros forever — even if some Stark lessons will stay with her. What were your thoughts when you first learned how Game of Throneswould end? I really loved that the story begins with the Starks and ends with the Starks. Overall, I liked it. The thing is that for 10 years, everyone had an…

access_time4 min.
a rare disorder takes the spotlight

For a relatively new and rare diagnosis, Munchausen syndrome by proxy has garnered quite a bit of screen time. The syndrome, in which a caretaker either fabricates an illness for a victim or induces it in them, entered the public consciousness only four decades ago, when British doctor Roy Meadow coined the term in a 1977 research paper. But since it made its pop-cultural debut in Nancy Wright’s 1984 true-crime book A Mother’s Trial, it has resurfaced onscreen every few years — on TV shows like The X-Files, Law & Order, Scrubs and True Detective and in films including The Sixth Sense, It and Everything, Everything — titles that capitalize on the syndrome’s dramatic potential, if not always adhering to its realities. Despite all this media attention, Munchausen syndrome by proxy “has…

access_time10 min.
‘she feels like a muse for me’

Debra Messing WILL & GRACE (NBC) “I bring a joy of physical comedy and trying to find opportunities for that and for finding the emotional undercurrent and turning the gas up on it so that the stakes are really, really high. Eric [McCormack] is a master at the dry wit and such a smart comic actor, and that in a way makes Grace look less intelligent, which I think is funny. There is some kind of intangible chemical alchemy that happens with us, and it happened from the very first moment that we met and we read together. And there’s something really beautiful coming back together after 12 years and realizing that it’s just still there, that the years really didn’t change us creatively in that way. Both of us had gone…

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