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category_outlined / Celebrity & Gossip
The Hollywood ReporterThe Hollywood Reporter

The Hollywood Reporter Emmy Special Issue 20B June 2019

The all-new Hollywood Reporter offers unprecedented access to the people, studios, networks and agencies that create the magic in Hollywood. Published weekly, the oversized format includes exceptional photography and rich features.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Prometheus Global Media
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48 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time5 min.
the hollywood reporter

Matthew Belloni EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Alison Brower DEPUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Shanti Marlar EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Tom Seeley DEPUTY EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, DIGITAL MEDIA Sudie Redmond EXECUTIVE MANAGING EDITOR Stephen Galloway EXECUTIVE EDITOR, FEATURES Jennifer Martin Laski PHOTO & VIDEO DIRECTOR Jeanie Pyun DEPUTY EDITOR Erik Hayden NEWS DIRECTOR Lacey Rose EXECUTIVE EDITOR, TELEVISION David Katz EXECUTIVE EDITOR, ARTICLES EDITOR-AT-LARGE Kim Masters FILM DEPUTY FILM EDITOR Tatiana Siegel • SENIOR FILM WRITERS Borys Kit, Pamela McClintock TECH EDITOR Carolyn Giardina • STAFF WRITER, FILM Mia Galuppo • INTERNATIONAL FILM EDITOR Deborah Young TELEVISION TELEVISION EDITOR, EAST COAST Marisa Guthrie • TELEVISION EDITOR, WEST COAST Lesley Goldberg • SENIOR WRITER, TELEVISION Michael O’Connell TELEVISION WRITERS Rick Porter, Bryn Elise Sandberg • MEDIA & POLITICS WRITER Jeremy Barr REVIEWS REVIEWS EDITOR Jon Frosch • CHIEF FILM CRITIC Todd McCarthy • CHIEF TELEVISION CRITICS Tim Goodman, Daniel Fienberg • CHIEF THEATER CRITIC David Rooney SENIOR EDITOR…

access_time4 min.
does it matter how a show ends?

Many high-profile TV series came to an end this past season — among them, CBS’ The Big Bang Theory; The CW’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend and Jane the Virgin; Netflix’s House of Cards and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt; and Amazon’s Catastrophe and Fleabag. But none left a bigger Emmy footprint during their runs than HBO’s two stalwarts: Game of Thrones, which has scored 128 nominations, more than any other scripted show in history, and 47 wins; and Veep, which saw Julia Louis-Dreyfus win the Emmy for best actress in a comedy in all six of its previous seasons. Most strikingly, both shows won the series Emmys in each of their past three seasons. Now the question is, will one or both go out with a four-peat? Thrones’ final season — and, in particular, its series…

access_time11 min.
dropping in for some drama

Ike Barinholtz Brooklyn Nine-Nine NBC MY TOP TAKEAWAY “There’s two things. One, in a greater sense, it made me miss The Mindy Project a lot and made me kind of remind myself, ‘Oh yeah, if you’re doing a comedy television show, that’s kind of the best job in the world because you truly get to laugh and try to make people laugh for a living — they pay you for it.’ And they paid me, the check cleared. So it really just kind of made me nostalgic and happy and made me think, ‘Oh yeah, I have to do a TV comedy again because it’s just great work.’ And then literally something I took away from it was [showrunner] Dan Goor sent me — my character Gintars is selling knockoff Gap clothing, he…

access_time4 min.
from olympian to kidding actress

On Showtime’s Kidding, as TV star and puppeteer Mr. Pickles (Jim Carrey) begins to unravel from the effects of suppressed grief, his family and colleagues devise a plan to keep their beloved children’s brand running without him. In steps Tara Lipinski to save the day. The gold medal-winning ice skater and NBC Sports commentator plays herself — albeit, a version who chain smokes, has a rivalry with her younger sister and a pet bird named Tarakeet — through several episodes of the comedy’s first season. She teams with Carrey’s character for a bigbudget touring show called Pickles on Ice, even donning a giant head in the likeness of Mr. Pickles. The 36-year-old Lipinski, who has acted on shows before (including Are You Afraid of the Dark?, 7th Heaven and Malcolm in the…

access_time6 min.
‘i did it to give them a voice’

It was sort of hard to resist,” says Adam McKay, 51, when THR asks him what brought him to working in television. Known for crowd-pleasing comedies like Anchorman and critically acclaimed movies like Vice, McKay stepped onto the small screen first with Eastbound & Down — and followed that up with the pilot of HBO’s breakout hit Succession, which he also executive produces. “Especially in the last 10 or 15 years,” he elaborates, “when you see TV go more toward a film style but still have that larger narrative arc.” And he’s not the only one who’s been wooed by Peak TV. For THR’s first-ever TV Director Roundtable, McKay was joined by some of Hollywood’s most high-profile helmers, including Ava DuVernay, 46 (Netflix’s When They See Us); Patty Jenkins, 47 (TNT’s…

access_time5 min.
‘every show has its own learning curve’

Working on a film, a director can be tied to one story for years. But in television, directors often hop from project to project in the span of months, moves that require an adaptability that comes more naturally when you join a world you did not create. “Every show is a little different, and the prep changes depending on the style of the show,” says Beth McCarthy-Miller, a veteran Saturday Night Live helmer whose more recent credits include directing popular series including Modern Family, Veep and 30 Rock. “Modern Family and Veep have more of a documentary-style shoot — you don’t have traditional single-camera coverage.” But even if the style of shooting is similar, there are often differences in the way the actors approach their work with directors. Modern Family, McCarthy-Miller says,…

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