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TV Guide MagazineTV Guide Magazine

TV Guide Magazine March 19, 2018

TV Guide Magazine tells you what’s worth watching. With its unparalleled access and authority, it's the only publication devoted exclusively to television. It includes celebrity interviews, in-depth previews, sneak peeks and authoritative reviews from critic Matt Roush.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
TV Guide Magazine, LLC
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31 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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editor’s letter

It’s been three decades since we met the Conners, a working-class family from fictional Lanford, Illinois, headed up by parents Roseanne, a factory line worker, and Dan, a contractor. Few shows since the ’70s had focused on characters struggling with the money problems that come with blue-collar jobs. And with the notable exception of the Hecks on The Middle, not many since Roseanne have really been about the stresses and strains of just getting by in America. Thanks to Roseanne Barr, the real-life stand-up comedian (above, with costar John Goodman), Roseanne was also a fantastic comedy, consistently ranked in the Top 20 during its nine-season run that started in 1988. (Though being rated as one of TV GUIDE MAGAZINE’s “Greatest TV Shows of All Time” is even more notable to…

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ask matt

@TVGMMattRoush I enjoyed NBC’s coverage of the Winter Olympics, but Johnny Weir and his outfits were way, way overboard and an insult to most of my friends, who flipped to another channel when he was on. Whoever allowed his outfits and hair should be placed on a dog-grooming show or fired, but will probably be promoted. —Tom MATT ROUSH: obviously this is a matter of taste, and Weir’s flamboyant whimsy will not be to everyone’s, but like several of this year’s proudly out olympians, his costumes are not going back into the closet. so my advice is not to take it seriously, because why would you? What really matters is whether he and tara lipinski were up to the challenge of providing solid figure-skating analysis, and to me, they were. But at…

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stuff we love

READING MATERIAL HAP AND LEONARD SERIES BY JOE R. LANSDALE Available where books are sold With SundanceTV airing Season 3 of Hap and Leonard, I had good reason to speed through the first three books (out of over two dozen stories) that have inspired the series so far. In 1980s Texas, draft dodger Hap Collins (played by James Purefoy) and his bud Leonard Pine (Michael K. Williams), a black, gay Vietnam vet, navigate through adventures that often involve bad guys, sunken treasure, the law and an ex-wife of Hap’s who brings trouble with her everywhere she goes. They’re an exciting, fast read. —John Bernikow, Associate Art Director FOR YOUR EARS ONLY ROB HAS A PODCAST Listen on RobHasAWebsite.com The tribe has spoken…and a notable castaway is speaking back! Former Survivor all-star Rob Cesternino (left) dishes and analyzes…

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the bachelor ’s thorny affair

IT TRULY WAS the most dramatic Bachelor finale ever. When Arie Luyendyk Jr., 36, began his quest for love, the Arizona-based real-estate agent and race car driver—formerly a suitor on The Bachelorette in 2012—was best known for being a mild-mannered charmer whose on-camera make-out sessions earned him the nickname “The Kissing Bandit.” Now, he’ll likely go down as the most hated Bachelor in history. After proposing to fan fave Becca Kufrin, a 27-year-old publicist from Minnesota, Arie broke up with her weeks later (on TV!) and then reunited with his runner-up, Lauren Burnham, 26. They got engaged on the March 6 After the Final Rose special—and to the huge approval of viewers, Becca was named this summer’s Bachelorette. So what was running through Arie’s head… and what does the future…

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ratings

America’s Most Watched 25 TOP SHOWS David Ogden Stiers 1942–2018 THERE ARE FEW tougher jobs in show business than stepping into the shoes—or combat boots—of a famous sitcom character. In 1977, David Ogden Stiers had the unenviable task of replacing M*A*S*H’s Larry Linville, who played buffoonish Maj. Frank Burns for five seasons, as the new foil for Hawkeye (Alan Alda) and B.J. (Mike Farrell). Stiers, who died March 3 at age 75 of bladder cancer, succeeded brilliantly by aiming high, not low. An erudite and stuffily pretentious contrast to his wisecracking bunkmates, Stiers’s Maj. Charles Emerson Winchester used wit and culture as his weapons. “I had an image of William Buckley in mind,” executive producer Burt Metcalfe told TV GUIDE MAGAZINE in 1978 of creating “a far more formidable opponent” for his irreverent heroes. “David…

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crime scene

Marcia Clark Investigates: The First 48 Premieres March 29, 9/8c, A&E When it comes to stories of murder, blackmail and other dastardly deeds, former prosecutor and defense attorney Marcia Clark is all in. “It’s an abiding passion of mine that has been with me since birth,” Clark says. “I am my own audience!” That love serves Clark well in the new crime series Marcia Clark Investigates: The First 48, in which the woman who tried to take down O.J. Simpson revisits infamous cases like the unsolved murders of Caylee Anthony, Stacy Peterson and Chandra Levy. In each two-hour episode, she digs deep into the crucial first two days of the original investigation. “In my experience, the vast majority of evidence that is needed to prove someone did something is found in the…

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