技術 & 遊戲
The NES/SNES Book

The NES/SNES Book

The NES SNES Book

Discover two great books in one! The NES Book The Nintendo Entertainment System was a remarkable success for Nintendo. Redesigned for the Western market – it was known in Japan as the Famicom – it arrived following the great videogame crash and helped to reignite interest in the console market. Many huge franchises like Metroid, The Legend Of Zelda and Mega Man started off on the NES and it helped turn Nintendo into a huge force in the console market. It remains greatly loved by many gamers and developers and we wanted to put together a book that reflected that love. With that in mind, we’ve personally selected the greatest NES content to ever appear in Retro Gamer magazine. The SNES Book Nintendo had its work cut out with the release of its Super NES. While it had dominated the 8-bit generation with its NES, Sega already had a 14-month head start with its own 16-bit console, and a host of arcade exclusives from Sega and third-party publishers. Assisted by its fabled use of Mode 7 and hits such as Super Mario World, Secret Of Mana, Street Fighter 2 and Axelay, Nintendo’s machine won over the public and it remains an essential console for any collector, delivering a diverse range of games that few other systems of the time could hope to match. With that in mind we’ve taken this opportunity to celebrate some of the console’s finest games.

國家/地區:
United Kingdom
語言:
English
出版商:
Future Publishing Ltd
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本期

1 最少
welcome to the nes book

The Nintendo Entertainment System was a remarkable success for Nintendo. Redesigned for the Western market – it was known in Japan as the Famicom – it arrived following the great videogame crash and helped to reignite interest in the console market. It wasn’t quite as successful in Europe, but in Japan and America it reigned supreme, and eventually went on to sell over 60 million units-not bad for a machine that many wrote off as a toy when it was first released. Many huge franchises like Metroid, The Legend Of Zelda and Mega Man started off on the NES and it helped turn Nintendo into a huge force in the console market. Indeed, for a long time it was Nintendo’s most successful home console, being only eclipsed by the staggering success…

19 最少
over 30 years

Masayuki Uemura, the NES’ creator, gives his head a little shake and laughs. “I thought the NES taking off was impossible,” he admits. “I think Mr. Arakawa, [first president of Nintendo Of America], never thought it would either. But in the entertainment industry, the unexpected happens. I feel so grateful people still play the NES. I can’t believe I’m here!” Professor Uemura is sitting opposite us in the conference room of the National Videogame Arcade in Nottingham, speaking through his affable interpreter Akinori ‘Aki’ Nakamura. He has been invited by the NVA to give a talk about the creation of the Famicom, renamed the Nintendo Entertainment System or NES for its Western release, and seems genuinely surprised with the love that the console still generates three decades after it made it…

1 最少
spot the difference

FAMICON □ The distinctive colour scheme of the Famicom was taken from Nintendo President Yamauchi’s scarf, though Uemura says they never quite got the shade right. □ The controllers were wired into the console to save on production costs and could be clipped into place on either side of the machine. □ The second controller had a built-in microphone which could be used as an input device, an idea clearly ahead of its time. NES □ The front-loading system was designed to make the machine look like a video recorder rather than a games console. □ The restyled controllers adopted the colour scheme and more angular look of the NES and could now be plugged in and out. □ Cartridges were shielded once inserted to discourage children with wandering fingers getting an electric shock. TOP LOADER □ The remodelled…

1 最少
kong story

If you’ve read David Sheff’s excellent history of Nintendo, Game Over, you’ll be aware that Nintendo initially approached Atari about distributing its console in the United States, and Uemura was one of the people tasked with showing Atari its work in progress. “They were really surprised we were making our own hardware [for a home console],” he recalls. “We had to show them the blueprint of the PCB to prove we had made it. They didn’t believe it was our work! But the reason we could make such hardware is because we had made such amazing arcade hardware. That was very important. We weren’t just looking at other consoles. We were thinking about Donkey Kong!” Indeed, it was a squabble over the rights to the home conversions of Donkey Kong…

2 最少
franchise starters

SUPER MARIO BROS. □ Of course he had appeared in Donkey Kong, albeit with a different name and profession, and Mario and Luigi had already starred in an frenetic coin-op, but this is where the brothers really showed the world what they could do. Super Mario World may have topped our chart of your favourite games of all time but this is where it all began. MEGA MAN □ Rock hard – that’s the man himself and the level of difficulty typical in this long-running series which debuted in 1987. The side-scrolling run-and-gun action of the original has you leaping platforms and blasting foes with a weapon handily attached to his arm. Defeating bosses rewards you with new weapons and so the carnage continues. LEGEND OF ZELDA □ After Mario, Link must surely be Nintendo’s…

1 最少
under the hood

EXPANSION PORT □ This expansion port was included for the possibility of any extra add-on devices for the console, such as disk drives and modems. However, none of the projects using the expansion port ever saw the light of day, so it’s a vestigial connector PPU □ The Picture Processing Unit was custom-built for the NES, again by Ricoh. It was a very capable piece of graphics hardware in 1983, able to display 64 sprites and up to 25 colours on the screen simultaneously from a palette of 54. CPU □ The Ricoh 2A03, a modified version of the popular 6502 CPU, is an 8-bit processor running at 1.79MHz. It’s a close relative of the CPUs used in the Atari 8-bit range, the Commodore 64, the Apple II and the BBC Micro. RAM □ The biggest limitation…