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UNCUTUNCUT

UNCUT

January 2020 #272

Published by BandLab UK Limited. Uncut is the essential magazine about rock music, written by people who love that music as much as you do. Every month, it features the most comprehensive and trustworthy album reviews section in the world. There are in-depth interviews with the finest musicians of the past five decades, and with the exciting new artists who are following in their great tradition. Insightful, informative, passionate about extraordinary music – that’s Uncut.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bandlab UK Limited
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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editor

AT the end of a momentous and perplexing year, it is comforting to keep a few certainties close at hand. The return of favourites such as Wilco, Lambchop, Bill Callahan and Bon Iver over the course of the last 12 months, for instance, has provided a degree of reassurance. It’s also heartening to see the variety and quality of music made by emerging artists in our world. You’ll find many of these faces – familiar as well as fresh – in our Top 75 new albums list. I’m not going to divulge much about the chart here – or the results of our other polls for best archive releases and best films. I can tell you, though, that 41 contributors voted this year, for 379 different new releases and 175…

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just a shot away

“They had something – they understood the spirit of the blues, and they were good musicians”GUS CORAL WHEN The Rolling Stones entered Holborn's Kingsway Sound studios on October 7, 1963, to record what would become their first Top 20 single – the Lennon-McCartney number “I Wanna Be Your Man” – photographer Gus Coral was on hand to take what he believes to be the earliest photos of the band in a studio. Coral had been invited to Kingsway, having first photographed the band the previous evening on tour in Cardiff. Coral, who went on to make documentaries and work closely with Goldie, had first seen the band play in Richmond and was quickly impressed. “I responded to the blues and when I heard the Stones I could hear they responded to it,…

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running the voodoo down

“There were some great bits we didn’t have room for – we even had a recording of his voice before it changed”NICOLE LONDON, PRODUCER “IF anybody wants to keep creating they have to be about change,” said Miles Davis. It’s a fitting quote to kick off Miles Davis: The Birth Of The Cool – a cradle-to-grave journey through the life of an artist who changed the course of music several times. In two hours, veteran documentary maker Stanley Nelson whizzes through 65 years in the life of the self-styled Prince Of Darkness: from East St Louis to 52nd Street, via heroin and coke addiction, gruelling throat and hip operations, and troubled relationships with women – all accompanied by that haunted, Harmon-muted trumpet. The filmmakers interviewed more than 150 people, including some big-name…

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“there’s a lot of tears”

“THE defining thread to all this is what my wife calls ‘timeless humanity’,” says Eric D Johnson of his new three-way project, Bonny Light Horseman. “Friends keep texting me, saying, ‘Man, these songs are making me cry!’ There’s a lot of tears. People have always loved and lost, had sex and been sad, but the fact these songs are so ancient yet so relevant is very powerful for people.” The Fruit Bats leader and sometime member of Califone and The Shins formed Bonny Light Horseman last year with acclaimed singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell and multi-instrumentalist/producer Josh Kaufman. Drawn together by a deep-rooted fascination with traditional folksong, they cemented the union with an appearance at Wisconsin’s Eaux Claires festival, run by Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon and Aaron Dessner of The National. “We didn’t…

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whatever he brings…

THE closing track of 1988’s Falling Up, “Am I Really Marcel?” may have been the closest Kevin Ayers got to writing an autobiography. “I’m naturally lazy but what can I do?” he sang. “I was born in the wrong place and the wrong time too.” Shooting At The Moon: The Collected Lyrics Of Kevin Ayers maps out the life of the greatest underachiever of London’s psychedelic underground in songs, personal photographs, handwritten notes and recipes for various fish dishes rescued from the carrier bags of personal memorabilia found in his house following his sudden death in 2013, aged 68. His daughter, singer-songwriter Galen Ayers, has curated this scattershot retrospective; and if it is an incomplete picture of a complicated man, his dissolute life makes it a minor miracle that so…

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a quick one

Commemorating 40 years since Unknown Pleasures, the latest in our Ultimate Music Guide series covers both Joy Division and New Order. Stephen Morris introduces an issue blending insightful new reviews with entertaining archive features, as the accidental pop pioneers venture from Manchester to Ibiza and beyond. It’s in UK shops now… Following on Nov 22, adjust your heartbeat to 9/8 time for our Ultimate Genre Guide to the golden age of UK Progressive Rock. Genesis, King Crimson, Caravan and many more join a hearty celebration of flute solos and side-long suites… This month, cutting-edge Chicago label International Anthem mounts something of a takeover of the EFG London Jazz Festival. Inventive drummer Makaya McCraven plays Village Underground (Nov 19), spiritual jazz soothsayer Angel Bat Dawid is at Kings Place (Nov 16), while trumpeter…

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