EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Food & Wine
Victoria

Victoria Flowers & Gardens 2017

In a frantic and hurried world, Victoria offers a respite from the chaos of everyday life. The pages are dedicated to living beautifully when entertaining, cooking, and decorating and even in artistic pursuits - and now you can enjoy every single page on your tablet! With a distinct personality all its own, Victoria personifies feminity, passion, and an enterprising spirit. Each issue features decorating and entertaining ideas, recipes, travel stories, essays from inspiring women, and much more.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hoffman Media
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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7 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
dear friends

Maybe when Wordsworth lauded the beauty of the daffodil, “fluttering and dancing in the breeze,” that golden crowd was among the first of the season to blast their cheery trumpets across the English landscape. Blooms in any season hold such sway over the senses—perhaps, in part, for their beauty and variety. Flowers occupy a special place in our hearts at Victoria, not to mention our homes and gardens. And we know that you, dear readers, share our affection. That is why we are so pleased to bring you this special edition of Victoria Classics, featuring magnificent landscape s, public and private, that serve as both shared retreats and personal havens. The belle of the Gulf Coast region, Bellingrath Gardens (featured on page 11) has a history that is inextricably linked to its…

2 min.
legacy of loveliness

Gazing across the sixty-five acres of flowering plants and overarching trees that comprise Bellingrath Gardens, it’s hard to believe these Edenlike environs had such humble beginnings. The transformation from fishing post to botanical wonderland is principally due to the efforts of one determined woman, Bessie Mae Morse Bellingrath, wife of Coca-Cola bottling magnate Walter Bellingrath. Kind and generous to the core, she was a behind-thescenes benefactor to many in her community, often offering to purchase plants from needy families, under the guise that she had searched far and wide for just those very specimens. In 1927, Bessie began working with architect George Bigelow Rogers to develop the “Belle Camp” grounds. Those first azaleas were joined by other Southern favorites, such as bougainvilleas, hibiscus, and hydrangeas. It wasn’t long before flowers were…

1 min.
wonders among the stones

“GARDENS AND FLOWERS HAVE A WAY OF BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER, DRAWING THEM FROM THEIR HOMES.” —Clare Ansberry…

2 min.
abloom on a distant shore

A landmark of the Windsor Farms neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia—a planned community designed to evoke the charms of historic England—Agecroft Hall nestles easily into its tranquil woodland setting on the banks of the James River. Although the home’s story began long ago in Europe, a new chapter continues to unfold in the United States. “Today, the manor house, surrounded by glorious English gardens, welcomes visitors to step back in time to explore the world of Queen Elizabeth I and Shakespeare,” says Executive Director Anne Kenny-Urban. “Guests are entranced by the romance and chivalry of the era, and they relish the opportunity to experience it all firsthand.” Originally built in Lancashire, England, in the late fifteenth century, the manor was home to the Langley and Dauntesey families for more than four hundred years…

2 min.
cultivating a masterpiece

Just north of Los Angeles, picturesque San Marino, California, is home to the spectacular Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Even if one makes the pilgrimage to stroll through the galleries, who could resist being lured outdoors into 120 sumptuous acres of cultivated gardens? With a contemporary sensibility founded on retrospective craftsmanship, The Huntington strives to bridge multiple eras. “I hope there is a timelessness here,” says Jim Folsom, director of the Botanical Gardens. The estate was a gentleman’s farm with citrus groves, grapes, and nut trees, but the original owner, businessman Henry E. Huntington, yearned for additional gardens. Visionary gardener William Hertrich encouraged his employer to extend his avocation to the botanical arena. What began with the conversion of an unsightly gully to a four-acre water lily garden in 1904 expanded…

1 min.
a serene woodland dream