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Woman's Weekly Living Series September 2021

Published by IPC Media. Published 9 times per year the Woman's Weekly Living Series has issues daedicated to health, gardening, cooking and knitting, as well as seasonal specials.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
$3.63

in this issue

2 min
good to share

Puppy love Puppies are programmed from birth to be man’s best friend. They know instinctively how to interact with humans without being trained, according to a study at the University of Arizona. The research is part of an ongoing programme with Canine Companions, an organisation which provides guide and service dogs to people with physical disabilities. It hopes to understand how dogs think and solve problems, to help them identify animals which could help us best. 3 reasons to… EAT AVOCADOS 1 THEY’RE GOOD FOR YOUR CHOLESTEROL Avocados are high in fibre, which can help keep blood cholesterol levels low. They’re packed with healthy fats, which are good for heart and brain health, and are linked to reduced inflammation in the body. 2 THEY’RE GOOD FOR YOUR HEART Avocados have more potassium than a banana. The…

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4 min
tiny tweaks to age-proof your brain

Go Greek Eating a Mediterranean diet – with more nuts, wholegrains and olive oil – can help reduce your risk of dementia, says the World Health Organization. ‘The health benefits of a Med diet are numerous.’ explains Conner Middelmann-Whitney, nutritionist at Modern Mediterranean (modernmediterranean.com) and author of Zest for Life: The Mediterranean Anti-Cancer Diet (£9.99, Honeybourne Publishing). ‘These ingredients’, she says, ‘are often nutrient dense and anti-inflammatory – both essential for good brain health.’ A study from Columbia University found that following a Med-style diet could help to preserve brain cells as we age, and slow the rate at which the brain shrinks by five years. Switch up your brain training Keeping your brain stimulated by reading, doing crosswords or sudoku, learning a musical instrument or a new language may help. But experts agree that…

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3 min
‘we’re no longer invisible women!’

It’s hard to believe that Lorraine Kelly is in her 60s, even if she has had her own breakfast TV show for almost three decades! There’s no denying that the bubbly Scot, 61, gives women half her age a run for their money – and even Lorraine herself agrees that it’s common for some ladies to look decades younger these days. She says, ‘I do believe that the 60s are the new 40s and I would say that’s got a lot to do with most of us these days not looking our age! Helen Mirren, Joan Collins, Meryl Streep – these women are in their prime.’ ‘It feels great to work on health campaigns like breast cancer’ Lorraine insists that women are no longer being silenced by ageing and the menopause, adding, ‘Before,…

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3 min
3 days to a flatter tummy

Fed up with your bulging tum? Get it under control with this easy three-day menu. It’s precisely calorie-controlled and low in salt to help you lose any excess fluid, reducing bloating around your middle. Eating an apple before each meal will make you feel fuller, so you eat less. You can swap the apples for a large undressed green salad or half a fresh grapefruit if you prefer. Follow the eating tips in the box, Stay Trimmer, to keep your great work going beyond the three days. Good luck! DAY ONE BREAKFAST One large Shredded Wheat (or the equivalent amount in small ones) with 125ml skimmed milk and 80g blueberries. PRE-LUNCH SNACK An apple. LUNCH 80g serving mixed salad dressed with 2tsp olive oil and lemon juice, or balsamic vinegar, to taste. Eat with a hard-boiled egg…

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4 min
8 cancer signs you might be missing

1 Bloating Abdominal bloating affects most of us at some time and is usually linked to digestive issues including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and coeliac disease. But occasionally, bloating can be a sign of a more serious condition, such as ovarian cancer. ‘It’s commonest after the menopause in women over the age of 50,’ says Dr Melanie Wynne-Jones. ‘It can be hard to diagnose early, as symptoms are often vague.’ Look also for pain in your side, back or lower tummy, passing urine more frequently, and irregular or postmenopausal vaginal bleeding. If symptoms are persistent or frequent (most days for three weeks), or you have a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, see your GP. 2 Bleeding after menopause This should always be checked, as it can be a symptom of either cervical or ovarian cancer.…

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4 min
knit yourself happy

We all know that a decent diet and regular exercise are crucial for good health. But knitting? Don’t knock it! Our hobbies could be more effective than medicine at keeping us fit and well. GPs are moving away from prescribing too many drugs, such as painkillers and antidepressants, and encouraging patients to become more active, creative and social instead – because, ultimately, it’s better for our health. ‘We’re built to move,’ says Dr Melanie Wynne-Jones. ‘Exercise helps to protect us against many diseases. It also releases endorphins, our brain’s feel-good hormones.’ This ‘social prescribing’ could cut visits to the GP and A&E by a quarter, according to research. And it’s not just because of the physical benefits. Hobbies can be good for our brains too. ‘Creative activities can help us switch off from…

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