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Woodworker's JournalWoodworker's Journal

Woodworker's Journal April 2017

Woodworker’s Journal is the magazine for people who love to work with wood. Woodworkers of any skill level will find top-tier plans to build great projects, expert reviews of woodworking tools, and a ton of woodworking tips and techniques. Get Woodworker's Journal digital magazine subscription today and get inspired and motivated.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rockler Press, Inc
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$11.95
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time7 min.
on the home front

WOODWORKING FOR YOUR HOME Most woodworkers do home improvement work. It’s just who we are. And, while most of us would not choose to call ourselves “DIYers” as the term has come to be known on cable TV shows, we are indeed “Do It Yourself” folks in the truest sense. If I need a new wall or cabinet in my house, there is a 99% chance that I will be building it. Which brings me to this issue of the magazine. Two of the projects, the bathroom vanity and the Murphy bed, are great examples of using woodworking skills to enhance your home. Trends change in kitchen and bathroom cabinetry — with that in mind, Anatole Burkin’s new vanity is a beautiful modern upgrade. And speaking of trends, Murphy beds are hot…

access_time4 min.
enlightening tips for your shop

Sponsored By GENERAL Easier-opening Spring Clamps While building a summer project with my teenage granddaughters, they found my 2" spring clamps difficult to squeeze open. So I devised this simple modification to make the clamps easier to use. I installed a 1/4"-20 carriage bolt into a pair of holes I drilled through the handles, then added a washer and a knob. Now the girls can simply twist the knob to open the clamps, or squeeze the handles and adjust the knob to hold the open setting. Loosening the knob closes the clamp. I think anyone with limited grip strength will appreciate this convenience. Jim Moorehead Barrigada, Guam Clamp-on Workbench Storage Trays These little 9" x 3" plastic organizer bins sure are handy to have around the shop, and you can find them at hardware or…

access_time4 min.
composite lumber: for the birds?

THIS ISSUE’S EXPERTS Dr. Jim Randolph, DVM, is a veterinarian practicing in Mississippi who regularly blogs at www.mypetsdoctor.com. Michael Dresdner is a nationally known finishing expert and author of The New Wood Finishing Book. Rob Johnstone is the publisher of Woodworker’s Journal. Contact us by writing to “Q&A,” Woodworker’s Journal, 4365 Willow Drive, Medina, MN 55340, by faxing us at (763) 478-8396 or by emailing us at: QandA@woodworkersjournal.com Please include your home address, phone number and email address (if you have one) with your question. QWe have some leftover composite lumber from a deck. I was planning to use it for birdhouses. Do you recommend composite lumber for birds, or is it harmful? Lavern Farmwald Grayson, Kentucky AWeighing durability and safety, the balance tips substantially to a “no” answer. Composite lumber, which is wood fiber mixed with recycled plastic,…

access_time2 min.
past tension

What’s This? Wesley Swartout of Spearfish, South Dakota, suspects this tool was used in a particular industry. Do you know what it is? Send your answer to stumpers@woodworkersjournal.com or write to “Stumpers,” Woodworker’s Journal, 4365 Willow Drive, Medina, MN 55340 for a chance to win a prize! For a video of a horsedrawn grain binder in use, please visit woodworkersjournal.com and click on “More on the Web” under the Magazine tab. In our December 2016 issue, we shared a mystery tool that Darryl Mickelsen of Austin, Minnesota, found at an auction. We wonder: was it a farm auction? Read on … “The device is a twine tensioner,” said Willard Dahlinghaus of Minster, Ohio. Harlen Maier of Stockton, California, elaborated: “These gears were used on a grain binder and maybe also on a corn binder…

access_time7 min.
maker of minis: tiny tools work!

After graduating from college with an art degree, Marco Terenzi spent a brief time making large, sculptural items — which would lead, he realized, to “a career path of selling to galleries.” At the same time, he was making metal miniatures of his items for fun. “I figured I liked doing it so much, I’m just going to keep making miniature things.” Marco’s specialty in miniature things just happens to be miniature woodworking hand tools. Built to 1/4 scale, his tools are not only miniature, but functional — although, he says, he sells them as collectibles: “I don’t know if those tiny screws would stand up to daily use.” In his own possession, however, is a jack plane measuring a little over 31⁄2" long that Marco says he uses “all the time.…

access_time6 min.
spindles from “riven” green wood

For a video on riving green wood for turning spindles, please visit woodworkersjournal.com and click on “More on the Web” under the Magazine tab. Almost any woodturner is familiar with turning bowls from green wood. Fewer know that spindles can be turned from green wood as well. Like bowls, it was a common practice before 1850. A commonly accepted factoid is that any spindle turned from green wood will check, or even split, and become unusable. This is not true, however, as long as you do not have a complete annular ring anywhere in the billet you turn your spindle from. It is not difficult to gather a billet that does not have a complete annular ring — especially if you do it in the traditional way. Wood Shrinks as it Dries As…

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