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Woodworker's JournalWoodworker's Journal

Woodworker's Journal October 2014

Woodworker’s Journal is the magazine for people who love to work with wood. Woodworkers of any skill level will find top-tier plans to build great projects, expert reviews of woodworking tools, and a ton of woodworking tips and techniques. Get Woodworker's Journal digital magazine subscription today and get inspired and motivated.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rockler Press, Inc
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$11.95
6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time4 min.
letters

Who Have You Taught? WILL WOODWORKERS COME AFTER YOU? I don’t know about you, but it is hard for me to remember when I was not a woodworker. One of my earliest memories is of my buddy Daniel and me building a treehouse (the first of many). I could not have been more than 7 years old. That impulse to build stuff continued until early adulthood, and here I am — still making things out of wood. My kids had those same impulses: I would come home to things cobbled together from wood, duct tape, cardboard, bedsheets ... you get the idea. But for some reason, none of my children would identify themselves as woodworkers today. They make stuff all the time, but none would be comfortable in a woodshop. And I…

access_time3 min.
tricks of the trade

Cable Ties Fix Stripped Holes Most woodworkers know that a toothpick or small sliver of wood driven into a screw hole can renew it when the wooden threads strip. I’ve found that nylon cable ties, also commonly called “zip ties,” work just as well when inserted in the hole and don’t deform the hole as much as a wood sliver will. Screws really bite into the soft nylon and hold very well. In fact, we fixed a stripped hole on my son’s 12-gauge shotgun, and he’s fired hundreds of rounds since the repair with no loosening of that screw. Kenneth Sarne Dade City, Florida Garage Door Draft Stopper No matter how well-insulated your garage workshop is, chances are good that air leaks around the garage door, so you lose heating or cooling efficiency. But…

access_time3 min.
questions & answers

Q I am currently rebuilding two cider presses made of maple with a cast-iron grinder that has been sandblasted. I want to apply a finish that will be safe to use around food and durable enough to withstand the physical action of apple crushing and pressing. What would be the best finish for both the maple and cast-iron components? Don Ouellette West Gardiner, Maine A Personally, I would leave them unfinished, but if you must finish them, go with oil-based spar urethane. It’s tough, flexible, will tolerate a lot of wear, and once it is cured, is perfectly acceptable for contact with apple juices. — Michael Dresdner QYour article in the April 2014 issue, “Heating a Woodshop,” talked about calculating heat requirements based on square footage of the workshop but said nothing about the…

access_time2 min.
stumpers ready? saw, set

The tool belonging to Robert Borgman of Sauk Centre, Minnesota, which appeared in our June issue was no mystery to many of you. As Bert Hooglander of Sarasota, Florida, among others, said, “This tool is a saw setting tool.” “After filing the teeth on a handsaw, they must be set with this tool,” explained James Yarborough of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. “It is adjustable for the amount of ‘set.’” “The saw is placed in a vise and the teeth are bent outward from the center line of the length of the saw,” said Dick Cowan of Belle Center, Ohio. “The knurled set screw on the upper left [of the June photo] determines the angle of set desired for density of wood and moisture content. The knurled set screw on the lower left is the stop…

access_time2 min.
shop talk

“Adventures in Wood” Contest a Hit Woodworking can be a solitary hobby,” says Rue Ann Flanders, assistant manager atRockler’s Indianapolis, Indiana, store, “so we wanted to showcase the extraordinary talent of our customers ... and give them an avenue to share their hard work with other wood enthusiasts.” That was the inspiration for the store to host its first “Adventures in Wood” juried woodworking competition, open to all area woodworkers this past May. A call for entries went out in April, and by mid-May, 19 projects were on display in the store. Then for two weeks, customers could place their vote for best project before the votes were tallied on May 30. An impressive array of projects were up for prize honors, including accent pieces, boxes, novelties, small casework and others created purely…

access_time8 min.
woodturning chasing threads

Threading wooden pieces dates back to Egyptian times and is welldocumented from the 1600s on. There are two ways to make them. One is with a thread box and tap (it would be a tap and die for metal thread cutting). Thread boxes are sold in standard sizes. You simply drill a hole in a piece of wood and turn the tap into it to create an inside, or female, thread. The thread box (die) is placed on the end of a piece of dowel and turned to allow a very sharp, V-shaped cutter to create the outside, or male, thread. Plenty of oil helps to cut cleaner thread; mineral, raw linseed or cooking oil all work very well. The second way to make threads in wood is to chase them…

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